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ACE Grades 9-12 » High School Course Catalog

High School Course Catalog

Select any subject below to see available courses

(Please note: courses and course content, including textbooks are updated regularly as changes are made. Students, please confirm course information with your school counselors.)
 
 
In the Columbia County School District, students are required to earn one unit in each of the three areas of science:  Physical Science or Physics, Biology, and Chemistry or Environmental Science.  These courses prepare our students for the state-mandated End-of-Course test(s) (EOC tests).   
 
For EOC test courses, the final average of the course and EOC test must be a 70 or above to receive credit.  Two pathways are provided for students.  All courses must be taken and successfully completed for the full year in order to receive credit for a lab-science course.

 

The recommended sequence of courses is based on the math skills and 8th grade Science performance which are essential for success in the science class. The recommended sequences are as follows.

 

Grade

Pathway 1

Pathway 2

8

Suggested Considerations *High School Physical Science

 

9

Biology*

Environmental Science

10

Chemistry

Biology*

11

Physics

Physical Science* or Physics

12

4th Science/AP Science

4th Science



SCI 301-302

  • 40.01100
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Physical Science
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Core/Elective
This course is designed to promote science process skills through study of properties of matter, atomic theory, chemical symbols, stoichiometry (reactions), periodic table, energy, mechanics, waves and energy transfer, electricity and magnetism.  Reference, research skills, and safety are additional instructional components within this course.  There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for Physical Science. 
 

SCI 323-324

  • 26.01200
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Biology
  • Grade Level: 9-10
  • Status: Required Core
This course is a fundamental survey of Biology. It is a study of scientific inquiry, biochemistry, cellular structure and function, heredity, organic variation, diversity of life, and ecology.  Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the course requirements.   This course introduces science process skills and laboratory safety, research, nature of biology, cellular biology, genetics, evolution, and classification.  There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for Biology. 


SCI 325-326

  • 40.05100
  • Pre-requisite: Coordinate Algebra
  • Credit: 1
  • Chemistry I
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

Chemistry includes the structure and composition of all substances and the changes that may occur within these substances.  The main topics include states of matter, atomic structure, chemical composition, reactions, dimensional analysis, acids and bases, and solutions. The overall outcome of chemistry is to develop skills in analytical critical thinking involving logical and quantitative relationships. Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the course requirements. 



SCI 375-376

  • 40.08100
  • Co-requisite: Advanced Algebra
  • Credit 1
  • Physics I
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

Covers basic mechanics (linear motion, Newton's laws, static forces, circular and angular motion, conservation of momentum and energy, applications of basic mechanics), kinetic theory (phases of matter, information retrieval), thermodynamics (characteristics, conservation), wave mechanics (general properties, sound, light, applications of wave mechanics), electricity (electrostatics, direct current, magnetism, alternating currents, applications of electricity), particle physics (quantum theory, subatomic and fundamental structure, applications of particle physics), and reference, research skills, lab safety, and process skills. Emphasizes particle physics, nuclear physics and special relativity.  

 

SCI 381-382

  • 40.09300
  • Pre-requisite: Teacher
  • Credit: 1
  • Forensic Science                                                                       
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Recommendation Status: Core/Elective

This lab-based course will focus on crime scene examination which includes analysis of fingerprints, hair, fiber, glass, soil and chemical evidence. Additionally, theory and laboratory skills of modern DNA, dentistry and serology forensics will be studied. Analytical thinking is an integral part of solving crimes. Consequently, other academic areas are also included in this class. The basis of many of the forensic units and labs includes Chemistry Applications, Pharmacology and Biotechnology.  

 

SCI 383-384

  • 40.06400
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit:  1
  • Earth Systems
  • Grade Level:  11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

Earth Systems Science is designed to continue student investigations that began in K-8 Earth Science and Life Science curricula and investigate the connections among Earth’s systems through Earth history. These systems – the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere – interact through time to produce the Earth’s landscapes, ecology, and resources. This course develops the explanations of phenomena fundamental to the sciences of geology and physical geography, including the early history of the Earth, plate tectonics, landform evolution, the Earth’s geologic record, weather and climate, and the history of life on Earth. Instruction should focus on inquiry and development of scientific explanations, rather than mere descriptions of phenomena. Case studies, laboratory exercises, maps, and data analysis should be integrated into units. Special attention should be paid to topics of current interest (e.g., recent earthquakes, tsunamis, global warming, price of resources) and to potential careers in the geosciences.  

 

SCI 333-334 (A)

  • 26.07300
  • Pre-requisite: Biology
  • Credit: 1
  • Human Anatomy/Physiology
  • Recommended: Chemistry I
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Recommended: Biology, Chemistry; minimum of "B" average in all science courses or teacher recommendation;

The primary objective of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to learn about the human body and its functions. The student will also be provided the opportunity to apply anatomical concepts and physiological functions to practical experiments. This course deals with an in-depth study of the body as a whole including the cell, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, urinary, and the reproductive systems. Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the course requirements.  Students who have completed HCS 203-204 have already earned credit for Human Anatomy/ Physiology are not eligible to take this course.  

 

SCI 337-338

  • 26.05100
  • Pre-requisite: BIO 323-324
  • Credit: 1
  • Microbiology
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

This course focuses on archaebacteria, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses.  Students will study historical microbiology, growth and identification of bacteria, control of microbial growth, pathogenic microbiology, food and dairy microbiology, and soil and water microbiology.  Students will utilize scientific inquiry to solve problems related to disease, bioterrorism, biotechnology and ecology. 

 

SCI 351-352 (full-year elective)

  • 26.01500
  • Pre-requisite: SCI 323-324
  • Credit:  1
  • Genetics                                                                              
  • Corequisite: SCI 403-404
  • Status:  Core/Elective
  • Grades:  11-12
  • Note: Limited Availability

This course introduces the basic principles of genetics. Classical genetics topics include: cell division, sexual reproduction, Mendel’s Laws of Heredity, the chromosomal basis of inheritance, the molecular basis of inheritance, gene to protein, gene expression and control, and recombinant DNA.  Students will acquire a basic understanding of the applications of molecular tools to the identification of isolated populations, the detection of kin, and the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Topics like the human genome project and forensic applications of genetic knowledge will also be explored. 

 

SCI 357-358

  • 26.06110
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Environmental Science
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

Environmental Science is designed as an integrated and global approach to science and technology. The concepts in this course focus on the links between living things, their surroundings, and the total environment of the planet. The scientific principles and related technology will assist the student in understanding the relationships between local, national, and global environmental issues. The intent of the course is to help individuals become informed, get involved, and care for one’s self and the environment.  

 

SCI 361-362

  • 40.02100
  • Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation  
  • Credit: 1
  • Astronomy                
  • Grade Level:  10-12                      
  • Status: Core/Elective

Introduces astronomy; covers science process skills, laboratory safety, measurements and motions, celestial clock, the moon, solar system, stars, the sun, Milky Way and other galaxies, cosmology, reference, and research skills. 

 

SCI 403- 404

  • 26.01400
  • Pre-requisite: Biology & Chemistry I
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Biology or Teacher Recommendation
  • Grade level: 10-12
  • Status: Core/Elective                   
  • Recommended: Biology I and Chemistry I; Minimum overall "B" average in science and mathematics coursework recommended.
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory Biology course and to prepare a student to take the Advanced Placement Qualifying exam in the spring. The course is divided into three general areas: 25% Molecules and Cells, 25% Genetics and Evolution, and 50% Organisms and Populations. The percentages indicate the weight of each topic on the AP College Board exam. In addition, the twelve laboratory activities required by the AP College Board will be conducted.  
 

SCI 405-406

  • 40.05300
  • Pre-requisite: Chemistry I
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Chemistry 
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Recommended: Biology, Chemistry; Must be enrolled in or have completed Math II; Minimum overall "B" average in science and mathematics coursework
This course will prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Qualifying Exam in the spring. Topics, such as structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibrium, and the basic concepts of thermodynamics, are presented in considerable depth. Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the course requirements. It is assumed the student will spend at least six hours a week in unsupervised individual study. 
 

SCI 407-408

  • 40.08420
  • Pre-requsite SCI 409-410 and Teacher Recommendation
  • Credit:  1
  • Advanced Placement Physics C: Electricity/Magnetism
  • Status:  Core/Elective
  • Grade Level:  11-12
  • Strongly Recommended: Biology, Chemistry, Physics; Must be enrolled in or have completed Calculus; Minimum of “B” average in all science and math coursework recommended.
This course will prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Exam in the spring. This course ordinarily forms the second part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. This course applies differential and integral calculus and provides instruction in each of the following five content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Designing experiments, interpreting data and communicating results of laboratory experiences are an integral part of the course requirements.  
 

SCI 409- 410

  • 40.08410
  • Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation 
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Physics C:  Mechanics            
  • Grade Level: 11-12       
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Strongly Recommended: Biology, Chemistry, Physics; Must be enrolled in or have completed Calculus; Minimum of “B” average in all science and math coursework recommended.
This course will prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Exam in the spring. This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. This course applies differential and integral calculus and  provides instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation.  Designing experiments, interpreting data and communicating results of laboratory experiences are an integral part of the course requirements.  

 

SCI 411-412

  • 26.06200
  • Pre-requisite: Biology, Chemistry
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Environmental Science
  • Grade: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Recommended: Biology, Chemistry; minimum of “B” average in all science and math coursework recommended;

This course will prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Qualifying Exam in the spring. This college prep course will provide students with a balanced approach to the diverse study of our environment. The emphasis will be placed on decision-making skills and laboratory experiences on the issues concerning our environment.   It is designed to expose students to a wide variety of environmental topics. This course is the equivalent of a one-semester college level Environmental Science course.   

 

SCI 475-476

  • 40.08310
  • Pre-Requisite: MAT 383-384
  • Credit:  1
  • Advanced Placement Physics 1
  • Grade Level:  11-12
  • Status:  Core/Elective

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.  Students should have completed analytic geometry and be concurrently taking Advanced Algebra.  

SOC 301-302                

  • 45.08100        
  • Pre-requisite:  None         
  • Credit:  1
  • U.S. History                                          
  • Grade Level:  11           
  • Status: Required Core

The study of U.S. History includes an overview of the settlement of the Americas, the American Revolution, constitutional period, antebellum era, and the Civil War.  Beginning with the Post- Reconstruction Era, the course includes a more in-depth concentration of both geographic characteristics and the changing political climate of our nation, the wars in which the United States was involved as well as social, economic, political, and contemporary issues. There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test.

 

SOC 303                     

  • 45.05700       
  • Pre-requisite: None       
  • Credit: 1/2
  • American Government
  • Grade Level:  9-12          
  • Status: Required Core

This course provides an in-depth study of the American political system. It focuses on the foundation, principles and structure of the American system of government; examines the roles of political parties and social factors as they relate to the role of the citizen; and analyzes the decision-making processes that are a part of the system of American political behavior. This course meets the state’s Citizenship/Government requirement for graduation. (Previously known as SOC 303 Citizenship/Civics 45.05110.)

 

SOC 305          

  • 45.06100
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1/2
  • Economics/Business/Free Enterprise
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Required Core

This course focuses on the American economic system. It covers fundamental economical concepts, microeconomics, macroeconomic, and international economic interdependence.  This course stresses the ability to analyze and to make decisions concerning public issues and personal finance.  There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for Economics. 

 

SOC 307

  • 45.06700
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: ½
  • Personal Financial Literacy
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

Financial literacy describes the skills needed for understanding the interactions of people with money and related matters.  The course is designed to help students develop that understanding by describing, analyzing, and evaluating many financial topics that most students will directly experience.  The standards in the course are consistent with nationally recognized concepts that are important to healthy financial literacy.  The elements of the course are aligned with current technology and laws - both of which can change rapidly - so instructors should verify any information they feel may be outdated.  The standards and elements can be taught in any sequence. 

 

SOC 311-312                  

  • 45.08300     
  • Pre-requisite: None        
  • Credit: 1
  • World History
  • Grade Level:  10          
  • Status:  Required Core

This is a survey course beginning with the earliest civilizations and highlighting important developments throughout the world until the early 21st century.  The course includes topics related to Early Civilizations and Classical Empires; Growth, Expansion, and the Emergence of the Modern World; Global Interaction and Conflict; and the Contemporary World.   

 

SOC 317-318              

  • 45.03100             
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Sociology                                                           
  • Grade Level: 10-12              
  • Status: Elective

Sociology covers social institutions, issues and problems in America. Topics include crime, deviance, gangs and other group types. Ethnic, racial, and gender issues, cultural and biological development, teen issues and the institutions of family, religion and sports are also addressed.  A sociology background prepares a student interested in law, government, social work and criminal justice.  

 

SOC 319-320             

  • 45.01500              
  • Pre-requisite: None            
  • Credit: 1
  • Psychology                                              
  • Grade Level: 10-12               
  • Status: Elective

Psychology is the study of human behavior.  Course topics include intelligence, personality, mental disorders, memory, sensation, perception and human development.  A Psychology background can help students understand human nature and the ways in which we think and act.  





SOC 321-322

  • 45.03200
  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit:
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Grade Level:
  • Status: Elective

Examines the diversity of American society, focuses on various ethnic groups that make up the American population. Covers cultural orientation, contributions of each group and cultural perspectives of each group. Integrates and reinforces social studies skills.

 

SOC 331-332 (full-year elective)  

  • 45.08120
  • Co-requisite: SOC 301-302, 405-406
  • Credit:1
  • U.S. History in Film         
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Elective
  • Note:  Limited availability

Explores United States History through film. This course includes analysis and interpretation of events through both print and film.  (Board-approved list of films only); No textbook is needed, though US History resource may be used. 

 

SOC 343

  • 45.08900
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1/2
  • Modern US Military History, 1918-present
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

Investigates United States Military History from 1918 to the present. Includes analysis of major battles, strategies, and weapon development. Integrates and reinforces social studies skills, especially map and globe skills.  There are no QCC's or GPS's associated with this course. 

 

SOC 355-356

  • 45.060
  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit:
  • Intro. to U. S. Intelligence and National Security Studies
  • Grade Level:
  • Status: Elective

Introduction to U. S. Intelligence and National Security Studies provides a basic and broad overview of the career field of Intelligence, the authorized activities of an intelligence professional, the composition of the United States Government Intelligence Community (IC), the various functions of each of the member agencies, the limits and capabilities of Intelligence and how Intelligence plays a role in the decision-making process of the government.  This course is also designed to apply critical analysis to the field of U. S. Intelligence.



SOC 361

  • 45.01100
  • Pre-requisite: None    
  • Credit:  1/2
  • Comparative Religions
  • Grade Level: 10 – 12      
  • Status:  Elective

Comparative Religions investigates the impact of world religions.  Focus will include the theological, ethical, philosophical, historical, psychological, and sociological impact on society.  Religions to be included are Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  

 

SOC 371

  • 45.09100
  • Pre-requisite: None    
  • Credit: 1/2
  • U.S. and World Affairs
  • Grade Level: 10 – 12      
  • Status:  Elective

U.S. and World Affairs analyzes selected geographic, cultural, economic, political, and historical patterns in post WWII Europe, Middle East, Asia, Oceania, Africa, and the Americas. Emphasis is on the global economy, terrorism, multi-national organizations, and the effects of population growth and density on the world community. This course prepares students interested in law, government, and international studies. (Textbook:  No textbook needed, though US History resource may be used) 

 

SOC 375         

  • 45.07110       
  • Pre-requisite: None       
  • Credit: 1/2
  • World Geography    
  • Grade Level: 9-12         
  • Status: Elective       

The student will investigate geographic concepts, physical phenomena and the relationship of people to their environment.  Instruction will use the geographic themes of regions, location, place, relationships within places and movement to understand the nature of an interdependent world.  There is a strong emphasis on map and globe skills.  Investigates regions of the world and how these regions influence the historical, economical, political and cultural development in an interdependent world. It includes geographic concepts, physical phenomena and the relationship of people to their environment as well as environmental issues and decision-making skills. The course covers regions, location (position on earth's surface), place (physical and human characteristics), relationships within places and movement (human interaction on the earth). 

 

SOC 377-378

  • 45.05900
  • Pre-Requisite: None
  • Credit 1
  • Peer Leadership
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

This course provides student leaders with an opportunity to further develop their leadership skills.  The course focuses on communication skills, interpersonal skills, problem-solving, conflict resolution, discrimination, group dynamics, peer pressure, and goal-setting.  The course provides students with an internship opportunity within the school to further develop their leadership skills.

 

SOC 403-404

  • 45.07700
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Human Geography
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.   The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. 

 

SOC 405-406      

  • 45.08200
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP United States History
  • Grade Level:  11        
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute: SOC 301-302

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.   AP U.S. History is an in depth study beginning with the settlement of the Americas, American Revolution, constitutional period, antebellum era, and the Civil War and Post Reconstruction Era.  It includes industrialization, the wars in which the U.S. was involved as well as the changing political, economic, social, and contemporary issues.  There is a state-mandated EOC test for this course.  

 

SOC 407-408

  • 45.08110
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP World History
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute:  SOC 311-312

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.   This course includes the study of cultural, political, social and economic history along with institutional and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage.  Research and writing skills are stressed in this course.  

 

SOC 409-410

  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Government/Politics: US
  • Grade Level:  9-12
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute:  SOC 303

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.  This course covers federalism, separation of powers, influences on the formulation and adoption of the Constitution, political beliefs, political parties and elections, interest groups, institutions and policy processes, and civil liberties and civil rights.  (This course may be substituted for the required course SOC303-American Government; however, students must complete the entire AP Government course (2 semesters) in order to meet graduation requirements for Government.) 

 

SOC 411-412      

  • 45.08400
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP European History
  • Grade Level:  10-12        
  • Status: Core/Elective

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.  AP European History is a course designed to explore the nature and characteristics of European History beginning with the Renaissance period and ending in the present.  Studying the intellectual, cultural, economic and political life of Europe helps students understand the important issues of today.   

 

SOC 415                            

  • 45.06200                  
  • Pre-requisite: None                   
  • Credit:  ½
  • AP Macroeconomics                                                    
  • Grade Level:  11-12                  
  • Status:  Core/Elective
  • Substitute:  SOC 305

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination. It is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students will learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify economic trends, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Students will also examine how individuals and institutions are influenced by employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students will prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in business, political science, and history.  This course may serve as a substitute for Economics SOC 305 (45.06100).  There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for this course.  

 

SOC 416

  • 45.06300
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit:  1/2
  • AP Microeconomics
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute:  SOC 305

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination. It is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students will learn the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system.  The primary course emphasis will be on the nature and functions of product markets and includes a study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.  The following topics will be addressed:  Basic Economic Concepts, the Nature and Functions of Product Markets, Factor Markets, and Market Failure and the Role of Government.  Students will prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in business, political science, and history.  This course may serve as a substitute for Economics SOC 305 (45.06100) There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for this course.  

 

SOC 419–420

  • 45.01600
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Psychology
  • Grade level: 11-12
  • Status: Elective

This course conforms to the prescribed College Board topics and examination.  A.P. Psychology is an advanced study of human behavior.  Course topics include biological bases of Behavior, states of consciousness, motivation and emotion, testing and individual differences, abnormal psychology and treatment of psychological disorders. A Psychology background can help students understand human nature and the ways in which we think and act. 

 

SOC 423-424                     

  • 45.01830                           
  • Pre-requisite:  LNG321-322; Teacher Approval          
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Seminar (Limited Availability)                                                             
  • Status:  Core/Elective
  • Grade Level: 11          

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. (Textbook: No textbook needed)

 

SOC 425-426                     

  • 45.01820                           
  • Pre-requisite: SOC 423-424 or LNG 409-410 and Teacher Approval         
  • Credit:  1
  • AP Research (Limited Availability)     
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Grade Level:  12

AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research-based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. (Textbook: No textbook needed)

MAT 209-210

  • 27.04810
  • Pre-requisite: Eligibility
  • Credit: 1/2 per semester
  • GSE Foundations of Algebra
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Status:  Core/Elective

This course is a first year high school mathematics course option for students who have completed mathematics in grades 6-8 yet will need substantial support to bolster success in high school mathematics.  The course is aimed at students who have reported low standardized test performances in prior grades and demonstrated significant difficulties and deficits in previous mathematics courses.  Students who have earned any high school core math credits are not eligible for this course.

 

MAT 211-212

  • 27.09810
  • Pre-requisite: REP Eligibility
  • Credit: ½ per semester
  • GSE Coordinate Algebra Support
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Status: Elective

This course is designed to provide additional instruction to students in their effort to master the standards of the more rigorous and relevant Coordinate Algebra course. This course may be taught concurrently or prior to a student’s regular math instruction.  The course will also preview math content while also giving extra time and utilizing a variety of strategies to help students build a stronger foundation for success in their current and future mathematics courses. (It is an elective only for students entering 9th grade in 2012 and beyond.)

 

MAT 213-214

  • 27.09820
  • Pre-requisite: REP Eligibility
  • Credit: ½ per semester
  • GSE Analytic Geometry Support
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Status:  Elective

This course is designed to provide additional instruction to students in their effort to master the standards of the more rigorous and relevant Analytic Geometry course. This course may be taught concurrently or prior to a student’s regular math instruction.  The course will also preview math content while also giving extra time and utilizing a variety of strategies to help students build a stronger foundation for success in their current and future mathematics courses. (It is an elective only for students entering 9th grade in 2012 and beyond.)

 

MAT 215-216

  • 27.09830
  • Pre-requisite: REP Eligibility
  • Credit: ½ per semester
  • GSE Advanced Algebra Support
  • Grade Level:  11
  • Status:  Elective

This course is designed to provide additional instruction to students in their effort to master the standards of the more rigorous and relevant Advanced Algebra course. This course may be taught concurrently or prior to a student’s regular math instruction.  The course will also preview math content while also giving extra time and utilizing a variety of strategies to help students build a stronger foundation for success in their current and future mathematics courses. (It is an elective only for students entering 9th grade in 2012 and beyond.)

 

MAT 381-382

  • 27.09710
  • Pre-requisite: 8th Grade Math
  • Credit: 1
  • GSE Coordinate Algebra
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Status: Required Core

This course is the first in a sequence of three high school courses designed to ensure career and college readiness. The course represents a discrete study of algebra with correlated statistics applications and a bridge to the second course through coordinate geometric topics.  There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test (EOC test) for this course.  (It is a core requirement for students entering 9th grade in 2012.) (

 

MAT 383-384

  • 27.09720
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 382
  • Credit: 1
  • GSE Analytic Geometry  
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Status: Required Core

The focus of Analytic Geometry on the coordinate plane is organized into 6 critical areas. Transformations on the coordinate plane provide opportunities for the formal study of congruence and similarity. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. The study of circles uses similarity and congruence to develop basic theorems relating circles and lines. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. Quadratic expressions, equations, and functions are developed; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Coordinate Algebra. Circles return with their quadratic algebraic representations on the coordinate plane. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for this course.  (This course is intended for students who entered 9th grade 2012 and beyond.)

 

MAT 385-386

  • 27.09730
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 384
  • Credit: 1
  • GSE Advanced Algebra  
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Status: Required Core

It is in Advanced Algebra that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into six critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to model periodic phenomena. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. (This course is intended for students who entered 9th grade 2012 and beyond.)  

 

MAT 325-326 (full-year BOR-approved 4th year math course)   

  • 27.08800
  • Pre-requisite:  MAT 385-386, 391-392, 365-366, or 375-376
  • Status: 4th Year Math Elective  
  • Credit:  1
  • Statistical Reasoning
  • Grade Level: 12

Statistical Reasoning is a two-semester fourth mathematics course option for students who have completed GSE Advanced Algebra or Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra. The course provides experiences in statistics beyond the GSE sequence of courses, offering students opportunities to strengthen their understanding of the statistical method of inquiry and statistical simulations. Students will formulate statistical questions to be answered using data, will design and implement a plan to collect the appropriate data, will select appropriate graphical and numerical methods for data analysis, and will interpret their results to make connections with the initial question. 

 

MAT 387-388

  • 27.09740
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 386
  • Credit: 1
  • GSE Pre-Calculus  
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Core/Elective

This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus, either in high school or college. Topics include understanding functions from symbolic, tabular, and graphical perspectives, transformations and function composition, polynomial functions, rational functions, trigonometry, and conic sections. In addition to content mastery, the course goals are to further develop students’ problem solving and critical thinking skills. (This course is intended for students who entered 9th grade 2012 and beyond.) 

 

MAT 377-378

  • 27.08500
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 366 or 374
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Mathematical Decision Making 
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Core/Elective

This is a course designed to follow the completion of Mathematics III or Accelerated Mathematics II.  The course will give students further experiences with statistical information and summaries, methods of designing and conducting statistical studies, an opportunity to analyze various voting processes, modeling of data, basic financial decisions, and use network models for making informed decisions.  

 

MAT 411-412 or 417-418

  • 27.07200 or 27.07300
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 376 or MAT 396 or Teacher Recommendation
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Calculus AB or BC
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Core/Elective

Recommended: 50 on the math section of the PSAT or 500 on the math section of the SAT or 22 on the math section of ACT; teacher recommendation; "B" average in math. This AP course consists of a full academic year of work that is comparable to a first year calculus course at a college or university.  It prepares the student for the AP Calculus AB or BC examination after in depth studies devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus.  Topics include analysis of graphs, limits of functions, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and related applications.      

 

MAT 415-416

  • 27.07400
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 376 or Teacher Recommendation
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Statistics                                    
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Core/Elective

AP Statistics has four themes: exploring data (observing patterns and departures from patterns); planning a study (deciding what and how to measure); anticipating patterns (producing models using probability and simulation); and, statistical inference (confirming models).   

   

SST 301-302

  • 35.06600
  • Pre-requisite: MAT 383-384
  • Credit: 1
  • SAT Prep Course
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

This course may be taken for one or two semesters. It is composed of nine weeks of English Language Arts and nine weeks of math instruction to prepare students for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). 

RDG 201-202 (23.0820021/23.0820022)
RDG 201-202R (23.1820021/23.1820022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Status: Elective
  • READING ENRICHMENT
  • This course, an extension of the Communication Skills course, focuses on reinforcement of the GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE based course. The student receives reinforcement in the following strands: Reading Literary texts, reading Informational texts, Writing, Conventions, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The emphasis is to offer reading skills, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing process activities, and conventions study. The course enhances reading skills necessary to promote continual development in language arts.

 

 

RDG 203-204 (23.0830021/23.0830022)
RDG 203-204R (23.1830021/23.1830022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level:10
  • Status: Elective
  • READING/WRITING I

This course provides fundamental skills development in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts, and writing genres associated with the student's English course), speaking, and critical thinking.

 

RDG 205-206 (23.0840021/23.0840022)
RDG 205-206R (23.1840021/23.1840022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Status:  Elective
  • READING/WRITING II

This course provides an extension of fundamental skills development addressed in Basic Reading/Writing I in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts, and writing genres associated with the students’ English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test-taking skills will be implemented.

 

RDG 207-208 (23.0850021/23.0850022)
RDG 207-208R (23.1850021/23.1850022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status:  Elective
  • READING/WRITING III

This course enhances the fundamental skills development addressed in Basic Reading/Writing I and II in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting in order to create an intensive small group environment; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts and writing genres associated with the student’s English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test-taking skills will be implemented.

 

RDG 209-210 (23.0860021/23.0860022)
RDG 209-210R (23.1860021/23.1860022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Elective
  • READING/WRITING IV

This course enhances an in-depth concentration on the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting in order to create an intensive small group environment; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts and writing genres associated with the student’s English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test-taking skills will be implemented.

 

RDG 211-212 (23.0810021/23.0810022)
RDG 211-212R (23.1810021/23.1810022)

  • Pre-requisite:
  • Credit: 1
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Elective
  • COMMUNICATION SKILLS

This course focuses on reinforcement of the GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE-based course. The students receive reinforcement in the following strands: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The emphasis is to offer reading skills, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing process activities, and conventions study.





ELL 211-212

  • 55.02100                 
  • Pre-requisite:  ELL Eligibility      
  • Credit:  1
  • ESOL I                    
  • Grade Level:  9                        
  • Status: Elective

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  The course content includes vocabulary, grammar, composition, literature, workplace communication skills, and research skills.  English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Language Learners (ELLs) in grades K-12 (Georgia School Law Section 20-2-156 Code 1981, Sec. 20-2-156, enacted in 1985). Title III is a federally funded program.  Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in English language proficiency and evidence of attainment to the exit level. The ESOL Program is a standards-based curriculum emphasizing language proficiency. The program’s overarching standard is that students will use English to communicate and demonstrate academic, social, and cultural understanding.  This course will not substitute for LNG 311-312 (23.06100). It is recommended that ELL students take this course prior to or in conjunction with LNG 311-312.

 

ELL 221-222

  • 55.02200
  • Pre-requisite: ELL 212          
  • Credit: 1
  • ESOL II                        
  • Grade Level: 10              
  • Status: Elective        

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  The course content includes vocabulary, grammar, composition, literature, workplace communication skills, and research skills.  English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Language Learners (ELLs) in grades K-12 (Georgia School Law Section 20-2-156 Code 1981, Sec. 20-2-156, enacted in 1985). Title III is a federally funded program.  Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in English language proficiency and evidence of attainment to the exit level. The ESOL Program is a standards-based curriculum emphasizing language proficiency. The program’s overarching standard is that students will use English to communicate and demonstrate academic, social, and cultural understanding.  This course will not substitute for LNG 321-322(23.06200). It is recommended that ELL students take this course in conjunction with LNG 321-322.

 

ELL 231-232

  • 55.02300
  • Pre-requisite: ELL 222      
  • Credit:  1
  • ESOL III                                      
  • Grade Level: 11            
  • Status: Elective         

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  The course content includes vocabulary, grammar, composition, American literature, workplace communication skills, and the research paper. English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Language Learners (ELLs) in grades K-12 (Georgia School Law Section 20-2-156 Code 1981, Sec. 20-2-156, enacted in 1985). Title III is a federally funded program.  Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in English language proficiency and evidence of attainment to the exit level. The ESOL Program is a standards-based curriculum emphasizing language proficiency. The program’s overarching standard is that students will use English to communicate and demonstrate academic, social, and cultural understanding.  This course will not substitute for LNG 231-232 (23.05100), a required course as determined by Georgia State Code: IDA (2).  It is recommended that ELL students take this course in conjunction with LNG 231-232.

 

ELL 241-242

  • 55.02400
  • Pre-requisite: ELL 232
  • Credit: 1
  • ESOL IV      
  • Grade Level: 12                  
  • Status: Elective              

This support course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  The course content includes vocabulary, grammar, composition, workplace communication skills, and English and world literature.   English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Language Learners (ELLs) in grades K-12 (Georgia School Law Section 20-2-156 Code 1981, Sec. 20-2-156, enacted in 1985). Title III is a federally funded program.  Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in English language proficiency and evidence of attainment to the exit level. The ESOL Program is a standards-based curriculum emphasizing language proficiency. The program’s overarching standard is that students will use English to communicate and demonstrate academic, social, and cultural understanding. This course will not substitute for LNG 341-342 (23.05200). It is recommended that ELL students take this course in conjunction with LNG 341-342.         

 

LNG 311-312

  • 23.06100
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Ninth Grade Literature/Composition
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Status: Required Core

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  It integrates writing, grammar and usage, literature, speaking, listening, and critical thinking skills. It presents the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and proofing; the study of form in personal narratives, descriptions, and expository papers with emphasis on technical writing. It includes reading a variety of multicultural literature: short stories, novels, tales, poetry, mythology, drama, and nonfiction. It emphasizes oral and written responses to literature, distinguishing characteristics of various genres, literary elements, and vocabulary study. There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for this course. 

 

LNG 321-322

  • 23.06200
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 312
  • Credit: 1
  • Tenth Grade Literature/Composition
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Status: Required Core

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  It develops descriptive, personal narrative, expository, and persuasive writing skills and includes grammar, mechanics, and usage.  It introduces a variety of authors and selections from world literature, poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and classical mythology. It engages students in the research process. It stresses vocabulary development and requires written literary analysis through discussion of the elements of literature. It develops thinking, organizing, interpersonal communication (both verbal and nonverbal), and the use of analogies, and metaphors and their application to writing. 

 

LNG 331-332

  • 23.05100
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 322
  • Credit: 1
  • American Literature/Composition
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Status: Core/Elective

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  It offers opportunities to improve reading, writing, speaking/listening, and critical thinking skills through the study of American literature. It includes a variety of literary genres and multicultural writers in a chronological or thematic pattern. It emphasizes developing control in expository writing (thesis support) and moving toward precision in personal narrative, descriptive, and persuasive writing.  It refines research skills. It integrates grammar, mechanics, and usage into the writing process. There is a state-mandated End-of-Course test for this course.  

 

LNG 341-342

  • 23.05200
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 332
  • Credit: 1
  • English (British) Literature/Composition
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Required Core

 

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  It offers opportunities to improve reading, writing, speaking/listening, and critical thinking skills through the study of literary selections from British/English writers organized chronologically or thematically. It emphasizes developing control in expository writing (thesis support) and moving toward precision in personal narrative, descriptive, and persuasive writing. It refines research skills.  It integrates grammar, mechanics, and usage into the writing process. The Capstone Project is a required element of the course and includes a research paper, a portfolio, a product, and an oral presentation.  (Students who participate in dual enrollment are required to earn credit in ENG 102 (Georgia Military College) or ENGL 1102 (Georgia Regents University or Augusta Technical College) to meet this requirement for graduation.)  

 

LNG 345-346               

  • 23.06700
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 332                  
  • Credit: 1
  • Multicultural Literature/Composition                               
  • Grade Level: 12                              
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute for LNG341-342

The course focuses on world literature by and about people of diverse ethnic backgrounds.  Students will explore themes of linguistic and cultural diversity by comparing, contrasting, analyzing, and critiquing writing styles and universal themes.  The students will write expository, analytical, and response essays.  A research component is critical. The students will observe, listen critically, and respond appropriately to written and oral communication.  Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking.  Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation.  The students will understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking.  Students may choose to take this course in place of English (British) Literature/Composition (LNG341-342); however, the Capstone Project will still be a required element of this course in order to meet the Senior English requirement (Policy IHF6) for graduation.  The Capstone Project includes a research paper, a product, a portfolio, and an oral presentation. (Students who choose to participate in dual enrollment (MOWR) in lieu of Senior English are required to earn credit in ENG 102 (Georgia Military College) or ENGL 1102 (Georgia Regents University or Augusta Technical College) to meet this requirement for graduation.)  

 

LNG357-358

  • 23.03400
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 331-332
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Composition
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Core/Elective

This course focuses on the writing process (planning, drafting, and revising). The students will focus on different writing genres and organizational structures: expository,argument, narrative, descriptive, comparison-contrast, exemplification, process analysis, classification, cause and effect, and definition. Advanced language skills (grammar and usage) will be a major component of this class. An emphasis on research is also required. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE. 

 

LNG 250-251

  • 23.03200
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Journalism I
  • Grade Level: 10-12            
  • Status: Elective

The purpose of this course is to teach students the basic elements of journalism, to give them practical experience in using journalistic skills, to understand the role of the press in a free society, and to examine various careers in journalism.  Course content is designed to assist the student in identifying newsworthy items, developing writing skills, learning the importance of background for news, recognizing and writing a good news lead, recognizing and writing news stories in the inverted pyramid form, and studying other methods of developing stories. Course content is designed to assist the student in studying, developing, and using a style sheet; distinguishing between fact and opinion; distinguishing between feature and news articles; writing feature articles; understanding and writing the role of the editorial in a newspaper; and recognizing and writing sports stories. 

 

LNG 252-253

  • 23.03300
  • Pre-requisite: Recommendation
  • Credit: 1
  • Journalism II
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Elective

Students are required to serve on the school newspaper staff in order to gain practical experience in journalism.  Course content is designed to assist the student in learning copy and proofreading symbols, planning new pages, learning to write and count headlines, understanding the importance of and effects of advertising, recognizing good photos for a newspaper,  understanding the role of a free press in American society, learning pertinent legal restrictions of the press, learning the responsibilities of a journalist, studying the history of American journalism, surveying the mass media and evaluating the advantages of each, and developing attitudes and personalities of the professional journalist. 

 

LNG 260-261

  • 23.04600
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Speech/Forensics I
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

Through practice in analyzing issues and presenting both sides of issues considered to be controversial, students will practice discussion, argumentation, and debate.  A great deal of time will be spent doing research and using library skills. 

 

LNG 262-263

  • 23.04700
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 261
  • Credit: 1
  • Speech/Forensics II            
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

Research, logic, analyzing issues, advanced debate techniques, and the current year’s National High School debate topic will be pursued. 



LNG 264-265

  • 23.04800
  • Pre-requisite: LNG 261
  • Credit: 1
  • Speech/Forensics III
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

Research, logic, analyzing issues, advanced debate techniques, and the current year’s National High School debate topic will be pursued. 

 

LNG 350-351

  • 23.04200
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Oral/Written Communication (Speech)
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

This introductory course in speech will emphasize the recognition and development of public speaking skills.  In addition to the preparation and presentation of formal and informal speeches, the student will learn basic rhetorical principles, study the techniques of effective delivery, investigate the nature of proof, employ guidelines for effective thinking, and employ inductive and deductive outlining structures.  Dramatic reading and debate will be introduced within the course. Students will be encouraged to participate in literary competitions.

 

LNG 361-362

  • 23.02400/23.02500
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: ½ per semester
  • Literature and History of the Old/New Testament Era      
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective
Old Testament: The purpose of the course shall be to accommodate the rights and desires of those teachers and students who wish to teach and study the Old Testament and to familiarize students with the contents of the Old Testament, the history recorded by the Old Testament, the literary style and structure of the Old Testament, the customs and cultures of the peoples and societies recorded in the Old Testament and the influence of the Old Testament upon law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and culture. Topics may include the historical background and events of the period; the history of the Kingdom of Israel; the poetry of the Old Testament; the influence of Old Testament history and literature on subsequent art, music, literature, law, and events, including recent and current events in the Middle East.

New Testament: The purpose of the course shall be to accommodate the rights and desires of those teachers and students who wish to teach and study the New Testament and to familiarize students with the contents of the New Testament, the history recorded by the New Testament, the literary style and structure of the New Testament, the customs and cultures of the peoples and societies recorded in the New Testament and the influence of the New Testament upon law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and culture. The topics may include the historical background and events of the period; the life of Jesus of Nazareth; the parables of Jesus; the life and travels of Paul; and the influence of New Testament history and literature on subsequent art, music, literature, law, and events. 

 

LNG 370-371

  • 23.03100
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Writers’ Workshop
  • Grade Level: 9-10 or 11-12
  • Status: Elective

This course is designed to make writers aware of the writing process and of various writing techniques.  The assignments will sharpen the skills students need for college English classes. 

 

LNG 377-378

  • 23.06400
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Literary Types/Composition
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status:  Elective

This course is designed to explore selections written by a variety of authors who many times are omitted in anthologies. Authors will be Southern authors, women authors, and minority authors. Aspects of the power and complexity of film will be explored.  Students will become discerning viewers of both contemporary and classic film with a focus on explaining key terminology and cinematic effects. (Course formerly known as LNG 372-373, Comparative Literature/Composition 23.0220) 

 

LNG 374-375

  • 23.02100
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Mythology (Greek, Roman, Norse)
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Status: Elective

This course is designed for students who are working on grade level.  The course content includes myths from different cultures and religions.    

   

 LNG 405-406

  • 23.05300
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit:  1
  • Advanced Placement Language/Composition (American Literature/AP)
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute-LNG 331-332
  • Recommended: 22 in English on ACT or Verbal Score of 50 on PSAT or 500 on SAT; Teacher Recommendations; 85 or higher average in English.

This course is designed for those students who have demonstrated exceptional skills in English. Based on American and World Literature, this course includes advanced vocabulary study, intensive writing analysis, and close examination of selected literary works. 

 

LNG 407-408

  • 23.06500
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1
  • Advanced Placement Literature/Composition
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status: Core/Elective
  • Substitute- LNG 341-342
  • Recommended:  22 in English on ACT OR Verbal score of 50 on PSAT or 500 on SAT; Teacher Recommendation; 85 or higher average in English.

This course is designed for those students who have demonstrated exceptional skills in English.  Based on British and World Literature, this course includes advanced vocabulary study, intensive writing analysis, and close examination of selected literary works. The Capstone Project is a required element of the course and includes a research paper, a portfolio, a product, and an oral presentation.

 

LNG 409-410                   

  • 23.03800                           
  • Pre-requisite:  LNG321-322    
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Seminar                               
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Status:  Core/Elective

 AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

 

LNG 411-412                    

  • 23.03700                           
  • Pre-requisite: SOC 423-424 or LNG 409-410   
  • Credit: 1
  • AP Research
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Status:  Core/Elective

 AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research-based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. 

 

SST 301-302

  • 35.06600
  • Pre-requisite: None
  • Credit: 1/2
  • SAT Prep Course
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Status: Elective

This course may be taken for one or two semesters. It is composed of nine weeks of English Language Arts and nine weeks of math instruction to prepare students for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).

Pathway

EHS

GHS

GTHS

HHS

LHS

Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Plant and Landscape Systems

X

       

Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Fabrications

     

X

 

Forestry/Wildlife Systems

X

       

Horticultural Mechanical System

     

X

 

Architecture & Construction

Carpentry

X

       

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

X

       

Welding

X

 

X

   

Arts, AV/Technology and Communications

Audio - Video Technology and Film

X

 

X

   

Graphic Communication 

X

X

     

Graphic Design

X

X

X

   

Business Management & Administration 

Business and Technology

X

       

Entrepreneurship

X

       

Education and Training

         

Early Childhood Care and Education I

X

X

     

Early Childhood Care and Education II

X

X

     

Teaching as a Profession 

X

X

X

X

X

Government & Public Administration 

         

JROTC - Army

X

 

X

X

X

JROTC - Navy

 

X

     
 

Pathway

EHS

GHS

GTHS

HHS

LHS

Health Science

Therapeutic Services/Allied Health and Medicine 

   

X

X

 

Therapeutic Services/Emergency Medical Responder

     

X

 

Therapeutic Services/Patient Care

X

X

   

X

Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine 

X

X

X

 

X

Hospitality and Tourism

Culinary Arts 

X

 

X

   

Human Services

Food and Nutrition 

 

X

     

Personal Care Services - Cosmetology

   

X

   

Information Technology

Computer Science

 

X

X

X

 

Cyber Security 

X

X

X

X

X

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security 

Fire and Emergency Services/Firefighting

X

       

Law Enforcement Services/Forensic Science

 

X

X

X

X

Marketing

Marketing and Management

       

X

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Engineering and Technology

   

X

X

X

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Automotive Maintenance & Light Repair 

X

 

X

X

 

Work-Based Learning Opportunities are available to students that meet the criteria of the program.   Applications are provided by the school’s counselor.  All applications must be approved by the CTAE Coordinator.

(A) are courses that are articulated with Augusta Tech.

(4th Science) are courses that have been approved by the Board of Regents as a fourth science.

(4th Science NOT BOR) are courses that are NOT recognized as a fourth science by Board of Regents.

 

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Fabrications

  • Basic Science (AFN 201/202)
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I (AFNM 203/204)
  • Agricultural Metals Fabrication (AFNM 207/208)

Forestry/Wildlife Systems

  • Basic Science (AFN 201/202)
  • Forest Science (AFNR 203/204) 
  • Wildlife Management (AFNR 205/206)

Plant and Landscape Systems

  • Basic Agriculture Science  (AFN 201-202)
  • General Horticulture and Plant Science (AFNP 203/204)                                                                                    
  • Nursery and Landscape (AFNP 205/206)  

Horticultural Mechanical System

  • Basic Science (AFN 201/202)
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I (AFNM 203/204)
  • Plant Science and Biotechnology  (AFNP 209/210)

Architecture and Construction

Carpentry

  • Industry Fundamentals & Occupational Safety (ARC 201-202)
  • Introduction to Construction  (ARCC 203-204)
  • Carpentry I  (ARCC 205-206)

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

  • Industry Fundamentals & Occupational Safety (ARC 201-202)
  • Introduction to HVACR Systems I (ARCH 203-204)
  • HVACR II ( ARCH 205-206)

Welding

  • Industry Fundamentals & Occupational Safety (ARC 201-202)
  • Introduction to Metals (ARCW 203-204)
  • Welding I (ARCW 205-206)
  • Welding 2 (ARCW 207-208)
  • Welding 3 (ARCW 209-210)

Arts, AV/Technology & Communications

Audio - Video Technology & Film 

  • Audio - Video Technology & Film I (AVF 201-202)
  • Audio – Video Technology & Film II (AVF 203-204)                                                                        
  • Audio – Video Technology & Film III (AVF 205-206) 

Graphic Design

  • Introduction to Graphics and Design (AVG 301-302)
  • Graphic Design and Production (AVG 303-304)                                                                      
  • Advanced Graphic Design (AVG 305-306)

Graphic Communication

  • Introduction to Graphics and Design (AVG 301-302)
  • Graphic Design and Production (AVG 303-304)                                                                      
  • Advanced Graphic Output Processes (AVG 307-308)       

Business Management & Administration

Business and Technology

  • Introduction to Business & Technology (BMA 201-202)
  • Business and Technology (BMAT 203-204)
  • Business Communications (BMAT 205-206)  

Entrepreneurship

  • Introduction to Business & Technology (BMA 201-202)
  • Legal Environment of Business (BMAE 203-204)                                                                   
  • Entrepreneurship (BMAE 205-206)

Education Training

Early Childhood Care and Education I

  • Early Childhood Education I (EDU 201-202)
  • Early Childhood Education II (EDU 203-204)                                      
  • Early Childhood Education III (EDU 205-206)

Early Childhood Care and Education II

  • Early Childhood Education I (EDU 201-202)
  • Early Childhood Education II (EDU 203-204) 
  • Early Childhood Education Practicum (EDU 207-208)

Teaching as a Profession

  • Examining the Teaching Profession (EDUT 209/210)
  • Contemporary Issues in Education (EDUT 211/212)
  • Teaching as a Profession Practicum (EDUT 213/214)

Government & Public Administration

JROTC – Army*

  • JROTC Army Leadership 1 (RTC 201)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 2 (RTC 202)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 3 (RTC 203)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 4 (RTC 204)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 5 (RTC 205)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 6 (RTC 206)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 7 (RTC 207)                 
  • JROTC Army Leadership 8 (RTC 208)      

JROTC – Navy*

  • Naval Science I Cadet Field Manual (NRTC 201)                                             
  • Naval Science I Introduction to NJROTC (NRTC 202)
  • Naval Science: Maritime History (NRTC 203)
  • Naval Science II Nautical Science (NRTC 204)
  • Naval Science III Naval Knowledge (NRTC 205)
  • Naval Science III Naval Orientation and Skills (NRTC 206)
  • Naval Science IV Naval Leadership and Ethics (NRTC 207)
  • Naval Science IV Effective Communications (NRTC 208)

Health Science

Therapeutic Services/Allied Health and Medicine

  • Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 201-202)
  • Essentials of Healthcare (HCS 203-1H, HCS 204-1H) 
  • Allied Health and Medicine (HCS 205-2H, HCS 206-2H)  

Emergency Medical Responder

  • Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 201-202)
  • Essentials of Healthcare (HCS 203-1H, HCS 204-1H) 
  • Emergency Medical Responder (HCS 211-2H, HCS 212-2H)

Therapeutic Services/Patient Care

  • Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 201-202)
  • Essentials of Healthcare (HCS 203-1H, HCS 204-1H) 
  • Patient Care Fundamentals  (HCS 209-2H, HCS 210-2H)

Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine

  • Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 201-202)
  • Essentials of Healthcare (HCS 203-1H, HCS 204-1H)  
  • Sports Medicine (HCS 207-2H, HCS 208-2H)

 

Marketing

Marketing and Management

  • Marketing Principles (MKT 201/202)
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship (MKTM 203/204)
  • Marketing Management (MKTM 205/206)

 

Hospitality and Tourism

Culinary Arts

  • Introduction to Culinary Arts (HTR 201-202)
  • Culinary Arts I (HTR 203/204)
  • Culinary Arts II (HTR 205/206) 








Human Services

Food and Nutrition

  • Food, Nutrition, and Wellness (HUMN 201-202)
  • Food for Life (HUMN 203/204)
  • Food Science (HUMN 205/206) 

Personal Care Services - Cosmetology

  • Introduction to Personal Care Services (HUMC 201-202)
  • Cosmetology Services II (HUMC 203-204)
  • Cosmetology Services III (HUMC 205-206) 

Information Technology

Computer Science

  • Introduction to Digital Technology (IT 201-202)
  • Computer Science Principles (IT 307-308) or AP Computer Science Principles (IT 407-408)
  • AP Computer Science (IT 409-410) 

Cybersecurity

  • Introduction to Digital Technology (IT 201-202)
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity (ITC 203-204)
  • Advanced Cybersecurity (ITC 205-206) 

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

Law Enforcement Services/Forensic Science

  • Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security (LPS 201-202)
  • Criminal Justice Essentials (LPS 203-204)
  • Forensic Science and Criminal Investigations (LPS 205-206) 

Fire and Emergency Services/Firefighting

  • Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security (LPS 201-202)
  • Essentials of Fire and Emergency Services (FES 203-204)
  • Applications of Firefighting (FES 205-206)

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

Engineering and Technology 

  • Foundations of Engineering and Technology (STEM 301-302) 
  • Engineering Concepts (STEMT 303-304) 
  • Engineering Applications (STEMT 305-306)

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair 

  • Basic Maintenance and Light Repair (TDL 201-202)
  •  Basic Maintenance and Light Repair 2 (TDL 203-204)
  •  Basic Maintenance and Light Repair 3 (TDL 205-206)
  • Automobile Service Technology 4 (TDL 207-208)
  •  Automobile Service Technology 5 (TDL 209-210)


Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources



AFN 201-202                   02.47100(A) Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1

Basic Agriculture Science Grade Level:  9-12 Status: Elective

Introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents introductory skills, problem solving lessons, and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. (Textbook: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, © 2017; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631262357).


AFNM 203/204 01.42100 Pre-requisite: AFN 201/202 Credit: 1

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include small engine maintenance and repair, metal fabrication, wood working, electrical wiring, and maintenance of agricultural machinery, equipment and tractors (Textbook: Agricultural Mechanics:Fundamentals and Applications Updated, Precision Exams Edition, 7th Edition, © 2019

Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337918701). 


AFNM 207/208                    01.42400                     Prerequisite: AFNM 203/204   Credit: 1

Agricultural Metals Fabrication          Grade Level : 10 – 12     Status: Elective

This course is designed to provide students with a more in-depth study of agricultural metal fabrication.  Students interested in agricultural mechanics will have the opportunity to explore the many career possibilities in the field of agricultural metal fabrication.  Additionally, hands-on-laboratory activities enhance the classroom learning experience and provide students with the skills needed to participate in Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs and FFA Career Development Events. (Textbook: Welding: Principles and Applications, 8th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305494695).

 

AFNP 203/204       01.46100 (A) Pre-requisite: AFN 201-202 Credit: 1

General Horticulture & Plant Science Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

(4th Science)

Introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership program and activities.  (Textbook: Introductory Horticulture, 9th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781285424729 ).

 

AFNP 205-206                   01.47000 (A) Pre-requisite: AFNP 203-204 Credit: 1

Nursery and Landscape Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective

Designed to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge utilized by the green industry in Nursery Production Management and Landscape Design Management. (Textbooks:  Landscaping: Principles and Practices, 8th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337403429).

 

AFNP 209/210                            02.44100         Prerequisite: AFNM 203/204   Credit: 1

Plant Science and Biotechnology                           Grade Level : 10 – 12   Status: Elective 

                                                                                                                                                                         (4th Science)

This course introduces students to the scientific theories, principles, and practices involved in the production and management of plants for food, feed, fiber, conservation and ornamental use.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.(Textbook:  Principles of Field Crop Production, 4th Edition, © 2006; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780130259677).

 

AFNR 203/204                              03.45100             Prerequisite: AFN 201/202      Credit: 1

Forest Science                                                                           Grade Level : 10 – 12     Status: Elective

                                                                                                                                                                                            (4th Science)

This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study.  The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multiple-use resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. (Textbook:  Introduction to Forestry Science, 3rd Edition, © 2013; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781111308391).


AFNR 205/206                      03.45300                          Prerequisite: AFNR 203/204        Credit: 1

Wildlife Management                                                                 Grade 10 – 12                         Status: Elective

 This course introduces students to the principles of wildlife management and conservation and to opportunities for further education and careers in the field of wildlife biology. The course includes instruction in the history of wildlife management, ecological concepts, habitat assessment, habitat management techniques for wildlife, population dynamics, predator-prey relationships, wildlife species biology and identification, human-wildlife conflict resolution, the role of hunting in conservation, game and fish laws and regulations, hunters safety, and the application of scientific principles to managing wildlife habitat and populations. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.   (Textbook:  Wildlife and Natural Resource Management, 4th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305627741).


ARC 201-202 46.44500   Pre-requisite:  None     Credit:  1

Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety Grade Level:  9-12   Status:  Elective

Develops basic knowledge to function safely on or around a construction site and in the industry in general and is the foundational course that prepares students for a pursuit of any career in the field of construction.  Course includes:  basic content of OSHA standards, construction math, hand and power tools used in the field, general blueprints and basics of rigging safety.  (Textbook:  Core Curriculum: Introductory Craft Skills, Trainee Guide, 5th Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780134131436).


ARCC 203/204  (2 hours/1st semester)              46.54600 Pre-requisite:  ARC 201-202 Credit:  1

Introduction to Construction Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

Students will build on their knowledge and skills developed in Occupational Safety and will be introduced to the history and traditions of the carpentry, masonry, plumbing and electrical craft trades.  Course will also include knowledge of the care and safe use of hand and power tools and the differentiation between blueprints as related to each individual craft area.  (Textbook: Carpentry Level 1 Trainee Guide Hardcover, 5th Edition, © 2014

Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780133403800).


ARCC 205/206 (2 hours/2nd semester)           46.55000             Pre-requisite:  ARCC 203-204 Credit: 1

Carpentry I                               Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

Provides an overview of the building materials used in the carpentry craft.  It teaches techniques for reading and using blueprints and specifications especially as related to the carpentry craft.  Includes specific knowledge and skills in site layout floor and wall framing systems.  Also includes the basic industry terminology for a carpentry craftsperson. (Textbook: Carpentry Level 2 Trainee Guide Hardcover, 5th Edition, © 2015; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780133404654).


ARCH 203/204 (2hours/1st Semester)           47.51400 Pre-requisite:  ARC 201-202 Credit:  1        

HVACR I Grade Level:    10-12  Status:  Elective

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration I   

This course is preceded by the Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety course and offers an opportunity for students to build on the knowledge and skills developed in the Fundamentals course. Students will be introduced to two-construction craft areas. As the second step in gaining a Level One Industry Certification in one of two craft areas, the goal of the course is to introduce students to the basic building blocks of the HVACR and Low Voltage Electrical craft trades. Students will explore how the crafts affect the mechanical systems in a building and will learn and apply knowledge of the electrical, electronic, and mechanical components related to each trade. In addition, students will be introduced to, and develop skills to differentiate between tools used in each individual craft area. (Textbook: HVAC Level 1 Trainee Guide, V5, 5th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780135185094).




ARCH 205/206(2 hours/2nd Semester) 47.51500 Pre-requisite:  ARCH 203/204   Credit:  1

HVACR II Grade Level:  10-12   Status:  Elective This course is preceded by Introduction to HVACR Systems and provides students with a solid foundation in HVACR skills and knowledge involved with conditioning air within a given space. The course is the third step in gaining a Level One Industry Certification in HVAC, and builds on the concepts of math concepts introduced in Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety. Students will acquire knowledge of the hardware and systems used by an HVACR technician and basic installation skills. In addition, students will obtain general knowledge of refrigeration and heating processes, including electronic circuitry, and will learn about the integration between electrical and HVACR fields. The course will provide students with an understanding of joining and piping practices in HVACR systems, as well as an introduction to the skills and knowledge of conduit bending and installation. (Textbook: 

HVAC Level 1 Trainee Guide, V5, 5th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780135185094).


ARCW 203-204 (2 hours/1st semester)   48.58100  Pre-requisite:  ARC 201-202 Credit:  1

Introduction to Metals Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

This course is designed to acquaint participants with the three major technical occupations (welding, sheet metal, and machining) that are available in the metal forming, manufacturing, and metals/construction industries.  Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of SkillsUSA and encouraged to participate in competitive events. (Textbook: Welding Level 1 Trainee Guide, 5th Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780134131108).


ARCW 205-206 (2 hours/2nd semester)  48.55100 Pre-requisite:  ARCW 203-204 Credit:  1

Welding I Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

Basic knowledge of equipment in oxy-fuel and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW).  In oxy-fuel area, students will create accurate cuts and perform washing and gouging procedures; critique their work pieces by welding codes, identifying imperfections, common test methods, and evaluate setups to determine proper setup of work and equipment.  In SMAW, learn and model proper safety and learn to make judgment calls in selection of electrodes and metal preparation to create beads and fillet welds using various rods.  (Textbook: Welding Level 2 Trainee Guide, 5th Edition, © 2016

Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780134311104).


ARCW 207-208 48.55200 Pre-requisite:  ARCW 205-206  Credit:  1

Welding 2 Grade Level:  11-12     Status:  Elective

This course is designed to provide all students with the basic knowledge and safe operating skills required to perform industry entry-level skills in the use of shielded metal arc welding equipment (SMAW) and an introduction to gas metal arc welding (GMAW) setup and operations. (Textbook: None)



ARCW 209-210 48.55300 Pre-requisite: ARCW 207-208 Credit: 1

Welding 3 Grade Level: 11-12 Status:  Elective

This course is designed to provide all students with the basic knowledge and safe operating skills required to perform more advance industry entry-level skills in the use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), introduction to Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) process, and arc cutting and gouging processes using Plasma Arc and Air Carbon Arc equipment. (Textbook: None)



AVF 201-202   10.41810        Pre-requisite:  None Credit:  1

Audio - Video Technology Film 1 Grade Level:  9-12         Status:  Elective

Topics included in this course are:  terminology, safety, basic equipment, script writing, production teams, production and programming, lighting, recording and editing, studio production, and professional ethics, Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, Technology Student Association (TSA) and Student Television Network are examples of organizations integrated into the instructional program to provide leadership training and reinforce specific career and technical skills.  (Textbook:  Television Production & Broadcast Journalism, 3rd Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631262753).


AVF 203-204 10.41910 Pre-requisite: AVG 201/202  Credit: 1

Audio Video Technology and Film II Grade level 10-12 Status: Elective

This course is the second in a series of three that prepares students for a career in Audio Video Technology and Film production. Topics include Planning, Writing, Directing and Editing a Production; Field Equipment Functions; Operational Set-Up and Maintenance; Advanced Editing Operations; Studio Productions; Performance; Audio/Video Control Systems; Production Gra phics; Career Opportunities; and Professional Ethics. (Textbook: Video Production Handbook, 6th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Taylor & Francis; ISBN: 9781138693487).

 

AVF 205-206 10.42010 Pre-requisite: AVG 203-204  Credit: 1

Audio Video Technology and Film III Grade level 11-12 Status: Elective

This one-credit transition course is designed to facilitate student-led projects under the guidance of the instructor. Students work cooperatively and independently in all phases of production. Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, Technology Student Association (TSA), and Student Television Network are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program. (Textbook: Video Production Handbook, 6th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Taylor & Francis; ISBN: 9781138693487).


AVG 301-302 48.46100 Pre-requisite:  None Credit:  1

Introduction to Graphics and Design Grade Level:  9-12 Status: Elective

This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Graphics Production and Graphics Design pathways.  Students will be introduced to the processes involved in the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries.  In addition, this course offers a range of cognitive skills, aesthetics, and crafts that includes typography, visual arts, and page layout.   (Textbook: Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a Book, © 2017; Publisher: Pearson AdobePress; ISBN: 9780134663456).


AVG 303-304     48.46200 Pre-requisite:  AVG 301-302 Credit:  1

Graphic Design and Production Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

Focuses on the procedures commonly used in the graphic communication and design industries.  Experience in creative problem solving and the practical implementation of solutions across multiple areas of graphic communications will be gained.  (Textbook:  Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book, © 2017; Publisher: Pearson AdobePress; ISBN: 9780134663449).


AVG 305-306 48.42800 Pre-requisite:  AVG 303/304 Credit: 1

Advanced Graphic Design Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

Students will continue to explore the principles of design and layout procedures as they relate to graphic design.  Content will cover electronic systems and software programs used in graphic design, page composition, image conversion, and digital printing.  Knowledge and skills in digital design and imaging will be enhanced through experiences that simulate the graphic design industry and school-based and work-based learning opportunities.  Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of SkillsUSA and encouraged to participate in competitive events.  (Textbook: Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book, © 2017; Publisher: Pearson AdobePress; ISBN: 9780134663449)(Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a Book, © 

2017; Publisher: Pearson AdobePress; ISBN: 9780134663456).


AVG 307-308 48.47000 Pre-requisite: AVG 303/304 Credit 1 

Advanced Graphic Output Processes Grade level: 11-12 Status: Elective                   
As the third course in the Graphics Communication Pathway, students will gain more advanced levels of experience to complete the output processes of various projects in an increasingly independent manner. Students also learn to manage the output and completion process as a whole including customer relations management, printing, finishing, and binding. Students will continue to accumulate work samples that will constitute their personal portfolio. Upon successful completion of the course, students are prepared to move into employment or a post-secondary educational environment where self-motivation and a high level of skill are expected. (Textbook:   Graphic Communications Digital Design & Print Essentials, 6th Edition,

© 2018; Publisher: Goodheart-Willcox; ISBN: 9781631268762).                 



BMA 201-202 07.44130   Pre-requisite:  None           Credit:  1

Introduction to Business & Technology                           Grade Level:  9-12           Status:  Elective

Students will gain an understanding of business principles, financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by the business world.  Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course.  Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world.  Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business.  Competencies in the co-curricular student organization.  Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course.  After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry recognized credential Microsoft Office Specialist for Word Core Certification.  (Textbook:     Principles of Business, 9th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337904179).  


BMAE 203/204 06.41500     Pre-requisite: BMA 201-202     Credit:  1

Legal Environment of Business Grade Level:  10-12           Status:  Elective

Concentrates on the legal aspects of business ownership and management.  Legal issues will include contracts, sales, consumer law, agency and employment law, personal and real property, risk management, environmental law, and government effects on business.  The impact of ethics on business operations and international business principles will also be studied. (Textbook:  Law for Business and Personal Use, 19th Edition, © 2017

Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305653009).


BMAE 205-206 06.41610 Pre-requisite: BMAE 203-204 Credit:1 Entrepreneurship Grade level: 11-12     Status: Elective 

How do you turn an idea into a business? Experience just that in this course! Entrepreneurship focuses on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business, operating and maintaining a business. Students will be exposed to the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and innovation in this course as they will either be the business owner or individuals working in a competitive job market in the future. Integration of accounting, finance, marketing, business management, legal and economic environments will be developed throughout projects in this course. Working to develop a business plan that includes structuring the organization, financing the organization, and managing information, operations, marketing, and human resources will be a focus in the course. Engaging students in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner will be fulfilled in this course. (Textbook: Entrepreneurship: Ideas in Action, Precision Exams Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337904698).


BMAT 203-204 07.44100      Pre-requisite: BMA 201-202 Credit:1 Business and Technology                                               Grade level: 10-12   Status: Elective                       

 How is technology used to solve business problems and communicate solutions? Business and Technology is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to be an asset to the collaborative, global, and innovative business world of today and tomorrow. Mastery use of spreadsheets and the ability to apply leadership skills to make informed business decisions will be a highlight of this course for students. Publishing industry appropriate documents to model effective communication and leadership will be demonstrated through project based learning. Students will use spreadsheet and database software to manage data while analyzing, organizing and sharing data through visually appealing presentation.  (Textbook: Principles of Business, 9th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337904179).

BMAT 205-206 07.45100      Pre-requisite: BMAT 203-204 Credit:1 Business Communications                                     Grade level: 11-12     Status: Elective

What message are you sending when you speak, write, and listen? As one of the most important skills for employers, students will explore the value of communication in their personal and professional life. The digital presence and impact of written and visual communication in a technological society will be addressed. Students will create, edit, and publish professional-appearing business documents with clear and concise communication. Creative design, persuasive personal and professional communications will be applied through research, evaluation, validation, written, and oral communication. Leadership development and teamwork skills will be stressed as students work independently and collaboratively. Presentation skills will be developed and modeled for students master presentation software in this course. (Textbook:  Business Communication, 3rd Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337403900)


EDU 201-202             20.42810     Pre-requisite:  None Credit:  1

Early Childhood Education I               Grade Level:  9-12 Status:  Elective

This course is the foundational course under the Early Childhood Care & Education pathway and prepares the student for employment in early childhood education and services.  The students will develop the basic skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children.  (Textbook:  The Developing Child, © 2016; Publisher: McGraw Hill; ISBN: 9780021399994).


EDU 203-204                                 20.42400    Pre-requisite: EDU 201-202   Credit: 1                                                                                                                                         Early Childhood Education II Grade level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

The course provides a history of education, licensing and accreditation requirements, and foundations of basic observation practices and applications. Early childhood care, education, and development issues are also addressed and include health, safety, and nutrition education; certification in CPR/First Aid/Fire Safety; information about child abuse and neglect; symptoms and prevention of major childhood illnesses and diseases; and prevention and control of communicable illnesses. Mastery of standards through project based learning, laboratory application, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organizations will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice when continuing their education and training. (Textbook:  Nutrition, Health and Safety for Young Children: Promoting Wellness, © 2017; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780133956764).


EDU 205-206 First Semester               20.52500        Pre-requisite: EDU 203-204  Credit:1 Early Childhood Education III                 Grade level: 11-12 Status: Elective
Early Childhood Education III is the third course in the Early Childhood Care and Education pathway and one option for program completers who may not have the opportunity of participating in the Early Childhood Education Internship. The course provides in-depth study of early brain development and its implications for early learning, appropriate technology integration, and developmentally appropriate parenting and child guidance trends. Also addressed are collaborative parent/teacher/child relationships and guidance, child directed play, the changing dynamics of family culture and diversity, the causes and effects of stress on young children, and infant nutrition. (Textbook:  Teaching, 2nd Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631260094).

         

EDU 207-208 Second Semester                 20.52600 Pre-requisite:  EDU 205-206 Credit:  1

Early Childhood Education Practicum Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

The practicum offers a candidate in the Early Childhood Education career pathway a field experience under the direct supervision of a certified early childhood educator (mentor). This field experience may be used as partial requirements for the candidate to earn the nationally recognized CDA credential. The practicum stresses observing, analyzing, and classifying activities of the mentor and comparing personal traits with those of successful early childhood educators. The candidate intern will develop a portfolio of their skills, plan and teach a lesson or lessons, understand and practice confidentiality as it pertains to the teaching profession, meet the needs of students with special needs, maintain the safety of the students, practice professionalism, and demonstrate ethical behavior. (Textbook:  Teaching, 2nd Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631260094).


EDUT 209/210                    13.01100                     Prerequisite: None                   Credit: 1

Examining the Teaching Profession               Grade Level : 9 – 12               Status: Elective

Examining the Teaching Profession prepares candidates for future positions in the field of education. Teaching Profession candidates study, apply, and practice the use of current technologies, effective teaching and learning strategies, the creation of an effective learning environment, the creation of instructional opportunities for diverse learners and students with special needs, and plan instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, community, and curriculum performance standards. Candidates will be prepared to practice their skills and knowledge at a variety of elementary and secondary education sites. Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organizations will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. (Textbook Teaching, 2nd Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631260094). 

 

EDUT 211/212                    13.01200                          Prerequisite: EDU 209/210                   Credit: 1

Contemporary Issues in Education               Grade Level : 10 – 12               Status: Elective

This course engages the candidate in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues.  The candidate will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States and actively examines the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside of the school.  Against this backdrop, the candidate will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy.  (Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training.) (Textbook: None)

 

EDUT 213/214                    13.01300                          Prerequisite: EDU 211/212                Credit: 1

Teaching as a Profession Practicum               Grade Level : 10 – 12           Status: Elective

The practicum offers a candidate in the Teaching as a Profession career pathway a field experience under the direct supervision of a certified teacher (mentor teacher). The practicum stresses observing, analyzing and classifying activities of the mentor teacher and comparing personal traits with those of successful teachers. The candidate intern will develop a portfolio of their skills, plan and teach a lesson or lessons, understand and practice confidentiality as it pertains to the teaching profession, meet the needs of students with special needs, maintain the safety of the students, practice professionalism, and demonstrate ethical behavior. (Textbook: None)


RTC 201-202       28.4310021/28.4320022  Pre-requisite:  None       Credit: 1   

JROTC Army Leadership Education 1 & 2 Grade Level:  9-12           Status:  Elective

The basic course includes a study of the Spirit of American Citizenship and Army JROTC, Techniques of Communication, Leadership, Drill and Ceremonies, Introduction to Cadet Challenge, First Aid, Map Reading, An overview of Citizenship through American History, Your American Citizenship, and Marksmanship.  (Teaching material provided by Army) 


RTC 203-204 28.4330023/28.4340024 Pre-requisite:  RTC 201-202 Credit:  1

JROTC Army Leadership Education 3 & 4 Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

The second year of JROTC continues the instruction begun in the first year.  It includes Techniques of Communication with a concentration on writing skills, Training for Cadet Challenge, Drill and Ceremonies, First Aid and Hygiene, an Introduction to Drug Abuse Awareness, Training in Map Reading, American Military History, Your American Citizenship, Role of the U.S. Army in National Affairs, Technology Awareness, and Marksmanship.

(Teaching material provided by Army)


RTC 205-206 28.4350025/28.4360026  Pre-requisite:  RTC 203-204 Credit:  1

JROTC Army Leadership Education 5 & 6 Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

The third year of Leadership Education and Training includes a continuation of Training in Techniques of Communication; Leadership Training with an Emphasis on Problem Solving Techniques; Training for Cadet Challenge; First Aid, Drill and Ceremonies; Drug Abuse Prevention Training; Map Reading; American Military History; Federal Judicial System; Role of the Armed Forces; Technology Awareness; Career Opportunities; and Cadet Challenge. (Teaching material provided by Army) (Teaching material provided by Navy)


RTC 207-208 28.4370027/28.4380028 Pre-requisite:  RTC 205-206 Credit:  1

JROTC Army Leadership Education 7 & 8 Grade Level:  12 Status:  Elective

The fourth year of training is based on a curriculum focused on having the student demonstrate the ability to work self-paced and to complete work in a given time frame.  Subjects covered are Techniques of Communication, Leadership, Preparation for Cadet Challenge, Drug Abuse Prevention Programs, and Drill and Ceremonies, American Military History from the Revolutionary Period to the Civil War, American Citizenship as it applies to Individual Responsibilities, Command and Staff procedures at the Battalion Level, Cadet Challenge, and Marksmanship. (Teaching material provided by Army)


NRTC 201-202 28.4210021/28.4220022              Pre-requisite:  None Credit:  1

Naval Science I Cadet Field Manual/Intro of NJROTC Grade Level:  9-12 Status:  Elective

The first year course includes an introduction to the NJROTC program and leadership, principles of health education, basic seamanship, military drill without arms, military customs and courtesy, first aid, orienteering, survival skills, and physical conditioning.

(Teaching material provided by Navy)


NRTC 203-204 28.4230023/28.4240024  Pre-requisite:  NRTC 201-202 Credit:  1

Naval Science II Maritime History/Nautical Science Grade Level:  10-12 Status:  Elective

The second year course includes naval orientation, American maritime heritage, leadership and the NJROTC leader, oceanography, health and first aid education, navigation, piloting, and rules of the nautical road, physical conditioning, and seamanship (boats, boat handling, signals and watch standing, shipboard indoctrination and military drill with arms.) (Teaching material provided by Navy)


NRTC 205-206 28.4250025/28.4260026 Pre-requisite:  NRTC 203-204 Credit:  1

Naval Science III Naval Knowledge/Naval Orientation Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

The third year course includes sea power today, the naval service as a rewarding way of life, naval history (global war at sea, naval leadership, and discipline), the U.S. Navy in American democracy, meteorology and weather, astronomy, electricity and naval electronics, survival training, physical conditioning, and military drill with arms. (Teaching material provided by Navy)


NRTC 207-208 28.4270027/28.4280028            Pre-requisite:  NRTC 205-206 Credit:  1

Naval Science IV Naval Leadership/Effective Communications  Grade Level:  12 Status:  Elective

The fourth year course includes Navy career planning and education, naval leadership, training, and evaluation, naval history (the nuclear age, military justice, international law and the sea, national strategy, and naval tactics), naval weapons, naval and maritime logistics, physical conditioning, and naval research and development. (Teaching material provided by Navy)


HCS 201-202 25.42100  Pre-requisite:  None Credit:  1

Introduction to Healthcare Science Grade Level:  9-12 Status:  Elective 

Enables students to receive initial exposure to Healthcare Science skills and attitudes applicable to the healthcare industry.  The concepts of health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as, ethical and legal responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider.  Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including medical terminology, microbiology, and basic life support; serves as a Prerequisite for all other Health Science courses.  (Textbooks:  Health Science: Concepts and Applications, © 2018; Publisher: Goodheart-Willcox; ISBN: 9781631265853; Introduction to Medical Terminology, © 2017; Publisher: Goodheart-Willcox; ISBN: 9781619606166)


HCS 203-1H, HCS 204-1H 25.44000 Pre-requisite: HCS 201-202 Credit 1

Essentials of Healthcare  Grade Level: 10 -12 Status: Elective

 Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. (Textbooks:  The Human Body in Health and Disease, 7th Edition, © 2018 Publisher: Elsevier; ISBN: 9780323402101;  Introduction to Medical Terminology, © 2017; Publisher: Goodheart-Willcox; ISBN: 9781619606166).


HCS 205-2H, HCS 206-2H 25.53700 Pre-requisite: HCS 203-204 Credit: 1

Allied Health and Medicine Grade Level: 10 -12 Status: Elective

 This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to become effective and efficient multi-skilled healthcare providers as they develop a working knowledge of various allied health opportunities. Students focusing on a career path in the healthcare field may apply classroom/lab knowledge and skills in the clinical setting as they participate in direct or simulated client care. The curriculum allows instructors to provide options for classroom/student growth opportunities in area(s) of interest to the student. (Textbook:  Medical Assisting: Administrative & Clinical Competencies, 8th Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Cengage Learning; ISBN: 9781337909815).


HCS 207-2H, HCS 208-2H 25.54600 Pre-requisite: HCS 203-204 Credit: 1

Sports Medicine        Grade Level: 10 -12           Status: Elective

Sports Medicine is the third course in the Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine Career Pathway. The course is appropriate for students who wish to pursue a career in healthcare with a focus on the musculoskeletal system, injury assessment, injury prevention, or rehabilitation including careers in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Services. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to therapeutic services skills and attitudes applicable to the healthcare industry. The concepts of anatomy and physiology, assessment, preventative and rehabilitative care are introduced. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated, including medical terminology, kinesiology, patient assessment, record keeping, and basic life support. (Textbook:  Sports Medicine Essentials: Core Concepts in Athletic Training & Fitness Instruction, 3rd Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781133281245).


HCS 209-2H, HCS 210-2H 25.53600 Pre-requisite: HCS 203-204 Credit: 1

Patient Care Fundamentals       Grade Level: 10 -12           Status: Elective

This course is designed to provide students interested in the careers that involve patient care with entry level skills most commonly associated with the career Nursing Assistant.  The students are required to meet both national and intrastate professional guidelines as designated by applicable regulatory agencies such as the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), Center for Disease Control (CDC), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with a specific focus on the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).  Upon completion of this course and its Pre-requisites, this course meets the Certified Nurse Assistant curriculum content as specified by the Georgia Medical Care Foundation.  (Textbook:  Nursing Assistant Care: Long Term Care and Home Health, 3rd Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Hartman; ISBN: 9781604250701).


HCS 211-2H, HCS 212-2H 25.55000 Pre-requisite: HCS 203-204 Credit: 1

Emergency Responder        Grade Level: 10 -12           Status: Elective

The Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) course prepares the student to provide initial stabilizing care to the sick or injured prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services Professionals (EMS), and to assist EMS personnel in transporting patients for definitive care at an appropriate hospital/facility. Major areas of instruction include Introductory Medical Terminology and Anatomy & Physiology; Responder Safety; Incident Command; Blood-borne Pathogen Training; Basic Physical Assessment; and Treatment of Trauma and Medical Emergencies; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the use of Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs). The course is a blend of lecture, hands on lab/learning, and practical scenario-based learning/testing. (Textbook:  EMR Complete – A Worktext, 2nd Edition, © 2014; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 9780133517033).


MKT 201/202                    08.47400                          Prerequisite: None                   Credit: 1

Marketing Principles               Grade level: 9-12 Status: Elective

Marketing Principles is the foundational course for all pathways in Marketing Education. Marketing Principles addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services.  Students develop an understanding of the functions of marketing and how these functional areas affect all businesses.  They learn basic marketing concepts and the role of marketing in our economy.  Students also develop skills in applying economic concepts to marketing, distribution and logistics, marketing information management, finance in marketing, product/service planning, pricing mixes, promotional strategies, and personal selling.  In order to increase the number of application experiences, students should participate in work-based learning activities and the student organization, DECA, An Association of Marketing Students. (Textbook: Marketing Dynamics, 4th Edition, © 2019; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631266256).

   

MKTM 203/204                    08.44100                          Prerequisite: MKT 201/202                   Credit: 1

Marketing & Entrepreneurship Grade Level : 10 – 12   Status: Elective

Marketing and Entrepreneurship is the second course in the Marketing and Management Career Pathway. Marketing and Entrepreneurship begins an in-depth and detailed study of marketing while also focusing on management with specific emphasis on small business ownership. This course builds on the theories learned in Marketing Principles by providing practical application scenarios which test these theories. In addition, Marketing and Entrepreneurship focuses on the role of the supervisor and examines the qualities needed to be successful. (Textbook: Entrepreneurship: Ideas in Action, 6th Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337904698).

 

MKTM 205/206                    08.44200                          Prerequisite: MKT 203/204                   Credit: 1

Marketing Management                Grade Level : 10 – 12               Status: Elective

Marketing Management is the third course in the Marketing and Management pathway. Students assume a managerial perspective by applying economic principles in marketing, analyzing operation’s needs, examining channel management and financial alternatives, managing marketing information, pricing products and services, developing product/service planning strategies, promoting products and services, purchasing, and professional sales. This course also includes global marketing where students analyze marketing strategies employed in the United States versus those employed in other
countries. (Textbook:  Glencoe Marketing Essentials, 1st Edition, © 2016; Publisher: McGraw Hill; ISBN: 9780021401109).


HTR 201-202  20.43100    Pre-requisite: None   Credit: 1 

Introduction to Culinary Arts Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective 

Introduces fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods where laboratory practice parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures. Course also provides an overview of the professionalism in the industry and career opportunities leading to a career pathway in Culinary Arts. (Textbook: The Culinary Professional, 3rd Edition, © 2017; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631264375).


HTR 203-204 (2 hours/1st semester)  20.5321 Pre-requisite: HTR 201-202 Credit: 1 

Culinary Arts I Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective Building from techniques and skills learned in Introduction to Culinary Arts, this fundamentals course begins to involve in-depth knowledge and hands-on skill master of Culinary Arts. (Textbook: Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts Level 1, 2nd Edition, © 2018; Publisher: ProStart; ISBN: FL1ST).

HTR 205-206 20.53310 Pre-requisite: HTR 203-204 Credit: 1 

Culinary Arts II Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

Course builds on techniques and skills learned in Culinary Arts I with strong importance given to refining hands-on production of the classic fundamentals in the commercial kitchen. (Textbook: Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts Level 2, 2nd Edition, © 2018 Publisher: ProStart; ISBN: FL2ST).


HUMN 201-202 20.41610 Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1 

Food, Nutrition and Wellness Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective 

Food, Nutrition and Wellness is an essential course in understanding nutritional needs and food choices for optimal health of individuals across the lifespan. Interrelationships with wellness are explored. This course leads to the advanced nutrition pathway and develops a knowledge base and the skills necessary to select among alternatives in the marketplace, with an emphasis on nutrient content, the development of chronic diseases, and food safety. (Textbook: Food, Nutrition & Wellness, © 2016; Publisher: McGraw Hill; ISBN: 9780021402564).


HUMN 203-204 20.41400 Pre-requisite: HUMN 201-202 Credit: 1 

Food for Life Grade Level : 10-12 Status: Elective 

Food for Life is an advanced course in food and nutrition that addresses the variation in nutritional needs at specific stages of the human life cycle: lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood including elderly. The most common nutritional concerns, their relationship to food choices and health status and strategies to enhance well-being at each stage of the lifecycle are emphasized. This course provides knowledge for real life and offers students a pathway into dietetics, consumer foods, and nutrition science careers with additional education at the post-secondary level. (Textbook: Nutrition Through the Life Cycle, © 2017; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305628007).


HUMN 205-206 20.41810 Pre-requisite: HUMN 203-204 Credit: 1 

Food Science Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective 

(4th Science) 

Food science integrates many branches of science and relies on the application of the rapid advances in technology to expand and improve the food supply. Students will evaluate the effects of processing, preparation, and storage on the quality, safety, wholesomeness, and nutritive value of foods. Building on information learned in Nutrition and Wellness and Chemistry, this course illustrates scientific principles in an applied context, exposing students to the wonders of the scientific world. Careers will be explored. (Textbook: Principles of Food Science, © 2015; Publisher: G-W Publisher; ISBN: 9781619604360).



HUMC 201-202 12.44400 Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1 

Introduction to Personal Care Services Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective 

This course introduces both fundamental theory and practices of the personal care professions including nail technicians, estheticians, barbers, and cosmetologists. Emphasis will be placed on professional practices and safety. Areas addressed in this course include: state rules and regulations, professional image, bacteriology, decontamination and infection control, chemistry fundamentals, safety, Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance, and anatomy and physiology. Students will experience basic hands on skills in each area to help them determine the pathway they are most interested in pursuing. By completing courses in the personal care services pathways, students can potentially earn credit toward the hours required by the Georgia State Board of Barbering and/or Cosmetology or hours toward their license as an esthetician or nail technician.  (Textbook: Milady Standard Cosmetology, 13th Edition, © 2016; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781285769417).


HUMC 203-204 (2 hours 1st semester) 12.51000 Pre-requisite: HUMC 201-202 Credit: 1 

Cosmetology Services II Grade Level 10-12 Status: Elective 

After exploring the different areas of Personal Care Services in the introduction course, students may choose to pursue further training in cosmetology services. This course as well as additional advanced cosmetology courses is aligned with the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology requirements and licensure, and with the Technical College System of Georgia. This course is designed to enhance the understanding of anatomy of the skin and hair relating to the Cosmetology Industry. Students will master shampooing, permanent waving, haircutting, basic skin care, and make-up application while maintaining safety and sanitation in the workplace set forth by OSHA standards. (Textbook: Fundamentals Cosmetology, © 2016

Publisher: Pivot Point; ISBN: 9781940593562).


HUMC 205-206 (2 hours 2nd semester) 12.51100 Pre-requisite: HUMC 2203-204 Credit: 1 

Cosmetology Services III Grade Level 10-12 Status: Elective 

This course will cover haircutting, hair color, and relaxers. Both theory and practical work will be implemented for students to have basic entry level skills in the field of cosmetology. Safety and infection control will be applied throughout this course. Professional work ethics, communication skills, critical thinking skills, soft skills and professional image will be utilized during this course. This course aligns to the regulations and requirements of the State Board of Cosmetology. The Pre-requisites for the course are Introduction to Personal Care Services and Cosmetology Services II. (Textbook: Salon Fundamentals Cosmetology, © 2010; Publisher: Pivot Point; ISBN: 9781934636664).



IT 201-202 11.41500 Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1

Introduction to Digital Technology Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective This course is designed for students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands-on activities and project focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/ choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. (Textbook: New Perspectives on Computer Concepts 2018: Comprehensive, 20th Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305951495).


IT 307-308 11.47100 Pre-requisite: IT 202 Credit: 1 

Computer Science Principles Grade Level 10 Status: Elective Limited Availability This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Course meets fourth science or world language requirement; Two computer science courses from the same pathway will satisfy two years of sequenced foreign language courses. Students satisfying the Foreign Language/American Sign Language/Computer Science requirement through the computer science option may not use the same courses to satisfy the 4th science requirement. (This is the second course of the CTAE Information Technology/Computer Science Pathway.) Textbook:TBD


IT 407-408 11.01900 Pre-requisite: IT 202, MAT 382 Credit: 1 Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles Grade Level 10 Status: Elective Limited Availability This course is designed to be the equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. Students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students will be encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. It is recommended that students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed a firstyear high school Coordinate Algebra/Algebra I course with a strong foundation in basic algebraic concepts dealing with function notation. Students should be able to use a Cartesian (x,y) coordinate system to represent points on a plane. Course meets fourth science or world language requirement; Two computer science courses from the same pathway will satisfy two years of sequenced foreign language courses. Students satisfying the Foreign Language/American Sign Language/Computer Science requirement through the computer science option may not use the same courses to satisfy the 4th science requirement. This course can be taken in place of IT 307--308 as part of the CTAE Computer Science Pathway. Textbook:TBD


IT409-410 11.01600 Pre-requisite: IT308, IT408 Credit: 1 

Advanced Placement Computer Science A MAT 386 AND/OR 

Grade Level: 12 Teacher Recommendation Status: Elective 

      (Meets 4th science  requirement) 

This course conforms to the College Board syllabus for the Advanced Placement Computer Science Examination. It covers programming methodology, features of programming languages, fundamental data structures, algorithms, and computer systems. Students should have prior knowledge in content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. This course will build upon computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. The following topics will be covered: object-oriented program design, program implementation, program analysis, standard data structures, standard operations and algorithms, and computing in context. (Textbook: Java Programming, © 2019; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781337397070).


ITC 203 -204 11.48100 Pre-requisite: IT 201-202 Credit: 1 

Introduction to Cybersecurity Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

This course is designed to provide students the basic concepts and terminology of cybersecurity. The course examines how the concept of security integrates into the importance of user involvement, security training, ethics, trust, application of cybersecurity practices and devices, and best practices management. The fundamental skills cover internal and external threats to network security and design, how to enforce network level security policies, how to protect an organization’s information, and a broad range of other topics. Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of cybersecurity. Professional communication skills will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of cybersecurity. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course. Introduction to Cybersecurity is the second course in the Cybersecurity career pathway of the Information Technology Career Cluster and primarily focuses on the National Cybersecurity Workforce Framework category Protect and Defend and the Computer Network Defense work roles. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology. (Textbook:  Networking Fundamentals, 3rd Edition, © 2020

Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781635634433).


ITC 205/206 11.48200 Pre-requisite: ITC 203-204 Credit: 1 

Advanced Cybersecurity Grade Level 11-12 Status: Elective 

This course is designed to provide students the advanced concepts and terminology of cybersecurity. The course explores the field of cybersecurity with updated content including new innovations in technology and methodologies. It builds on existing concepts introduced in Introduction to Cybersecurity and expands into malware threats, cryptography, organizational security, and wireless technologies. Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of cybersecurity. Professional communication skills will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of cybersecurity. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course. Advanced Cybersecurity is the third course in the Cybersecurity career pathway in the Information Technology Career Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology and Introduction to Cybersecurity. (Textbook:  Principles of Cybersecurity, © 2020; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781635635539).


LPS 201-202 43.45000 Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1 

Introduction to Law, Public Safety Grade: Level: 9-12 Status: Elective 

Corrections and Security This course begins with a study of various careers in public safety. The course will explore the history and development of law enforcement in the United States. Students will then examine the components of the criminal justice system, including the roles and responsibilities of the police, courts, and corrections. Additionally, students will learn the classification and elements of crimes. Students will receive instruction in critical skill areas including communicating with diverse groups, conflict resolution, the use of force continuum, report writing, operation of police and emergency equipment, and courtroom testimony. (Textbook: Introduction to Criminal Justice, 16th Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Cengage; ISBN: 9781305969766).


LPS 203-204 43.45100 Pre-requisite: LPS 201-202 Credit: 1 

Criminal Justice Essentials Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective 

Criminal Justice Essentials provides an overview of the criminal justice system. Starting with historical perspectives of the origin of the system, the course reviews the overall structure. Students will become immersed in criminal and constitutional law and will review basic law enforcement skills. The course ends with a mock trial to provide participants with a first-hand experience of the criminal justice system. The course will also provide in-depth competencies and components for the co-curricular SkillsUSA student organization that should be incorporated throughout instructional strategies of the course. Participation in additional student organizations that align with Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security pathways (i.e. mock trial) is encouraged to enhance standards addressed in the curriculum. (Textbook: Criminal Procedure (Justice Series), 3rd Edition, © 2018; Publisher: Pearson; ISBN: 978013548654).


LPS 205-206 43.45200 Pre-requisite: LPS 203-204 Credit: 1 

Forensic Science and Criminal Investigations Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective 

Forensic Science and Criminal Investigations is a course designed to contextualize scientific principles within the career studies of students interested in criminal justice. The course will utilize scientific equipment; therefore, instructors should have access to a science lab if their Career and Technical Education lab is not equipped. Students will study the forensic application of principles of chemistry, biology, physics and other disciplines. Students will utilize chromatography, electrophoresis, microscopic observation, and other scientific techniques in their studies. Students will also learn some investigative techniques and crime scene investigation skills through the lens of the scientific method. (Textbook: Forensic Science for High School, © 2016; Publisher: Kendall Hunt; ISBN: 9781465270764).


FES 203-204 43.46000 Pre-requisite: LPS 201-202 Credit: 1

Essentials of Fire and Emergency Services Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective

This course addresses the essential components needed for fire and emergency services. Students will be prepared for their third-course options that include the following: firefighting, emergency medical responder, and public safety communications. Students will explore career options, interagency communications, medical services, and basic firefighting standards. The prerequisites for this course are Introduction to Law, Public Safety and Corrections and Security. 




FES 205-206 43.44000 Pre-requisite: FES 203-204 Credit: 1

Applications of Firefighting Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective

This course, along with the prerequisite courses, is designed to meet the requirements of NFPA® 1001, Fire Fighter I. After completing this course, the student will be able to sit for the exam to certify as a Firefighter I per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA®) 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. This course is also based on the Basic Firefighting Training Program from the GA Public Safety Training Center (GPSTC). GPSTC has teacher-trainer resources (including skill sheets for those that are required) and recommended text. The prerequisites for this course are Introduction to Law, Public Safety Corrections and Security, and Essentials of Fire and Emergency Services. 



STEM 301-302 21.42500 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1 Foundations of Engineering and Technology Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective This course promotes technology awareness in areas of environmental concerns, societal issues and industry standards through the use of problem solving activities and hands-on applications with computer modules. These modules include CAD, CAP, CNC, Robotics, Electricity, Research and Design, Weather and Space, Audio/Video Production and Video Editing, Construction Technology, Telecommunications, Computer Graphics, Bio-related Technologies, Graphic Design and 3D Animation. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of TSA and encouraged to participate in competitive events. (Textbook: Foundations of Engineering & Technology, 7th ed., ©2018; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631268861) 

STEMT 303-304 21.47100 Prerequisite: STEM 301-302 Credit: 1 Engineering Concepts Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to develop a foundation in the basic skills required in the engineering fields. With an emphasis on communication skills required in the global marketplace, the student will create specialized projects in a chosen area of concentration, as well as, team problem-solving activities. Students will be given the opportunity to build upon the fundamentals of TSA and encouraged to participate in competitive events. (Textbook: Engineering Fundamentals Design, Principles, and Careers, 2nd Ed., ©2018; Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631262852)

STEMT 305-306 21.47200 Prerequisite: STEMT 303-304 Credit: 1 Engineering Applications Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective 

This course is designed to build on the skills learned in Pre-Engineering Technology by incorporating higher level activities in critical thinking and problem solving. Special projects will be completed in CAD/CAM/CIM applications or in communications, construction, energy/power and transportation, manufacturing, and bio-related fields, as well as, team problem-solving activities. Students will be given the opportunity to build upon the fundamentals of TSA and encouraged to participate in competitive events. (Textbook: Online Platform; Publisher: Solid Professor; https://www.solidprofessor.com/ ; ISBN: Online)


TDL 201-202 47.53110 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1

Basic Maintenance and Light Repair Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Elective

Course Description: This course is designed as the foundational course for the Automobile Maintenance and Light Repair pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. In addition, student will learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn electrical theory, perform basic tests and determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is advisor approval.  (Textbook:  Modern Automotive Technology, 9th Edition (online & book), © 2017 Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631263750) (Online eLearning Platform; https://www.electude.com/ ; Electude USA, LLC)

 TDL 203-204 (2 hours/1st semester) 47.53210 Prerequisite: TDL 201-202 Credit: 1

Maintenance and Light Repair 2 Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective

 Course Description: Students will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing, as well as replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. Students will also learn general electrical system diagnosis, electrical theory, basic test requirements, and determining necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. Standards for this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is Basic Maintenance and Light Repair. (Textbook:  Modern Automotive Technology, 9th Edition (online & book), © 2017 Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631263750) (Online eLearning Platform; https://www.electude.com/ ; Electude USA, LLC)

TDL 205-206 (2 hours/2nd semester) 47.53310 Prerequisite: TDL 203-204 Credit: 1

Maintenance and Light Repair 3 Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Elective

 Course Description: Students will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing, replacing brakes, as well as steering and suspension components. Students will learn about general electrical system diagnosis, electrical theory, basic tests that are required, and determine the necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The standards in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is Maintenance and Light Repair 2.  (Textbook:  Modern Automotive Technology, 9th Edition (online & book), © 2017 Publisher: Goodheart Willcox; ISBN: 9781631263750) (Online eLearning Platform; https://www.electude.com/ ; Electude USA, LLC)

TDL 207-208 47.53400 Prerequisite: TDL 205-206 Credit: 1

Automobile Service Technology 4 Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective

Students in this major will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. This career major will expose the student to courses in automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components.  They will also learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn electrical theory, perform basic tests and then determine necessary action. In addition, they will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this major are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. 

TDL 209-210 47.53500 Prerequisite: TDL 207-208 Credit: 1

Automobile Service Technology 5 Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Elective

Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components.  The students will also learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn about electrical theory, and perform basic tests to determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are and excellent foundation for an entry-level technician.



TOK 505 35.0800 Pre-requisite: IB DP candidacy Credit: ½

IB Approaches to Learning, Year 1 Gradel Level: 11 Status: Core

TOK 507 35.08700 Pre-requisite: IB DP candidacy Credit: ½

IB Approaches to Learning, Year 2 Grade Level 12 Status:  core

Through approaches to learning in IB programmes, students develop skills that have relevance across the curriculum that help them “learn how to learn”. Approaches to learning skills can be learned and taught, improved with practice and developed incrementally. They provide a solid foundation for learning independently and with others. ATL skills help students prepare for, and demonstrate learning through meaningful assessment. They provide a common language that students and teachers can use to reflect on and articulate on the process of learning. 


LNG 501-502SL 23.0730011 Substitutes for:

IB English A Language & Literature, Year 1, SL American Literature & Composition (23.05100)


LNG 501-502HL        23.0730012 Substitutes for Credit: 1 

IB English A Language & Literature, Year 1, HL American Literature & Composition (23.05100)    Status:  Core/Elective

                                      Grade Level:  11-12               

In this course, students study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In the language A: language and literature course students will learn about the complex and dynamic nature of language and explore both its practical and aesthetic dimensions. They will explore the crucial role language plays in communication, reflecting experience and shaping the world. Students will also learn about their own roles as producers of language and develop their productive skills. Throughout the course, students will explore the various ways in which language choices, text types, literary forms and contextual elements all effect meaning.  Through close analysis of various text types and literary forms, students will consider their own interpretations, as well as the critical perspectives of others, to explore how such positions are shaped by cultural belief systems and to negotiate meanings for texts.  Students will engage in activities that involve them in the process of production and help shape their critical awareness of how texts and their associated visual and audio elements work together to influence the audience/reader and how audiences/readers open up the possibilities of texts. With its focus on a wide variety of communicative acts, the course is meant to develop sensitivity to the foundational nature, and pervasive influence, of language in the world at large.

 


LNG 503-504SL 23.07311 IB English A Language & Literature, Year 2, SL Credit: 1

LNG 503-504HL  23.07312 IB English A Language & Literature, Year 2, HL Status:  Core/Elective

Grade Level:  11-12

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It extends the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics. 


LNG 505 23.0390011 Pre-requisite: IB DP candidacy Credit: 1/2

IB Theory of Knowledge, Year 1, Semester 2 Grade Level:  11     Status:  Core       

 


LNG 506 23.0400012 Pre-requisite: IB DP candidacy Credit: 1/2

IB Theory of Knowledge, Year 2, Semester 1 Grade Level:  12     Status:  Core      

Theory of knowledge (TOK) is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing, rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. It plays a special role in the DP by providing an opportunity for students to reflect on the nature of knowledge, to make connections between areas of knowledge and to become aware of their own perspectives and those of the various groups whose knowledge they share. It is a core element undertaken by all DP students, and schools are required to devote at least 100 hours of class time to the course. The overall aim of TOK is to encourage students to formulate answers to the question “how do you know?” in a variety of contexts, and to see the value of that question. This allows students to develop an enduring fascination with the richness of knowledge.  


MAT 505-506SL 27.0531011/27.0531012 Pre-requisite: MAT 385-386 Credit: 1

MAT 505-506GSL 27.2531011/s7.2531012 Grade Level: 11 Status: Core

IB MAT ANALYSIS/APPR Y1 SL

The Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches course is designed for students who wish to study mathematics as a subject in its own right or to pursue their interests in areas related to mathematics.  This course includes analytic methods with a strong emphasis on calculus and on algebraic, graphical and numerical approaches. It is designed for students who are interested in exploring real and abstract applications of mathematical concepts. In this course, students will develop strong skills in mathematical thinking and become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments.  Students will enjoy problem-solving and generalization. This course is suitable for students who may go on to further study in subjects that have a significant level  mathematics content, for example mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences or economics.


MAT 507-508HL 27.0533021/27.0533022 Pre-requisite: MAT 385-386 Credit: 1

MAT 507-508GHL 27.2533021/27.2533022 Grade Level: 11 Status: Core

IB MAT ANALYSIS/APPR Y1 HL 

The Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches course is designed for students who wish to study mathematics as a subject in its own right or to pursue their interests in areas related to mathematics.  This course includes analytic methods with a strong emphasis on calculus and on algebraic, graphical and numerical approaches. It is designed for students who are interested in exploring real and abstract applications of mathematical concepts. In this course, students will develop strong skills in mathematical thinking and become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments.  Students will enjoy problem-solving and generalization. This course is suitable for students who may go on to further study in subjects that have a significant level  mathematics content, for example mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences or economics.

MAT 509-510SL 27.0532011/27.0532012 Pre-requisite: MAT 505-506 Credit: 1

MAT 509-510GSL 27.2532011/27.2532012 Grade Level: 12 Status: Core

IB MAT ANALYSIS/APPR Y2 SL

The Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches course is designed for students who wish to study mathematics as a subject in its own right or to pursue their interests in areas related to mathematics.  This course includes analytic methods with a strong emphasis on calculus and on algebraic, graphical and numerical approaches. It is designed for students who are interested in exploring real and abstract applications of mathematical concepts. In this course, students will develop strong skills in mathematical thinking and become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments.  Students will enjoy problem-solving and generalization. This course is suitable for students who may go on to further study in subjects that have a significant level  mathematics content, for example mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences or economics.


MAT 511-512 HL 27.0534021/27.0534022 Pre-requisite: MAT 507-508 Credit: 1

MAT 511-512 GHL 27.2534021/27.2534022 Grade Level: 12 Status: Core

IB MAT ANALYSIS/APPR Y2HL 

The Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches course is designed for students who wish to study mathematics as a subject in its own right or to pursue their interests in areas related to mathematics.  This course includes analytic methods with a strong emphasis on calculus and on algebraic, graphical and numerical approaches. It is designed for students who are interested in exploring real and abstract applications of mathematical concepts. In this course, students will develop strong skills in mathematical thinking and become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments.  Students will enjoy problem-solving and generalization. This course is suitable for students who may go on to further study in subjects that have a significant level  mathematics content, for example mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences or economics.


SCI 501-502SL 26.01801 IB Biology, Year 1, SL               Biology 26.01200 Credit: 1 

SCI 501-502HL 26.01802 IB Biology, Year 1, HL               Biology 26.01201 Status: Core/Elective

Pre-requisite:  SCI 323-324 Grade Level 11-12

Biology is the study of life. The vast diversity of species makes biology both an endless source of fascination and a considerable challenge. Biologists attempt to understand the living world at all levels from the micro to the macro using many different approaches and techniques. Biology is still a young science and great progress is expected in the 21st century. This progress is important at a time of growing pressure on the human population and the environment. Core 1. Cell biology 2. Molecular biology 3. Genetics 4. Ecology 5. Evolution and biodiversity 6. Human physiology.  Student will also choose one of the four topics: 1. Neurobiology and behavior 2. Biotechnology and bioinformatics 3. Ecology and conservation 4. Human physiology. 


SCI 503-504HL 26.01902 Pre-requisite:  SCI 501-502  Credit:  1

IB Biology, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Core/Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It continues the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics related to 7. Nucleic acids 8. Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis 9. Plant biology 10.Genetics and evolution 11.Animal physiology. 


SCI 505-506SL 40.05501 IB Chemistry, Year 1, SL Pre-requisite:  SCI 325-326 Credit:  1

SCI 505-506HL 40.05502 IB Chemistry, Year 1, HL or Teacher Recommendation Status:  Core/Elective

Grade Level:  11-12

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. Chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Chemistry is often a Pre-requisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science. Both theory and practical work should be undertaken by all students as they complement one another naturally, both in school and in the wider scientific community. The DP chemistry course allows students to develop a wide range of practical skills and to increase facility in the use of mathematics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal and information technology skills, which are essential to life in the 21st century.  Core topics include the following:  1) Stoichiometric relationships, 2) Atomic structure, 3) Periodicity, 4) Chemical bonding and structure, 5) Energetics/thermochemistry, 6)  Acids and bases, 7) Redox processes, and 8) Measurement and data processing.


SCI 507-508HL 40.05602 Pre-requisite:  SCI 505-506 Credit:  1

IB Chemistry, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Core/Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It continues the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics related to 9) Chemical kinetics, 10) Equilibrium, 11) Organic chemistry, 12) Atomic structure 13) The periodic table—the transition metals 14) Chemical bonding and structure 15) Energetics/thermochemistry 16) Chemical kinetics 17) Equilibrium 18) Acids and bases 19) Redox processes 20) Organic chemistry 21) Measurement and analysis.  Students will also choose one of the four topics: A. Materials, B. Biochemistry, C. Energy, or D. Medicinal chemistry.


SCI 513-514HL 40.08502 Pre-requisite:  Teacher Recommendation  Credit:  1

IB Physics, Year 1, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Core/Elective

Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the very smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Despite the exciting and extraordinary development of ideas throughout the history of physics, observations remain essential to the very core of the subject. Models are developed to try to understand observations, and these themselves can become theories that attempt to explain the observations. Besides helping us better understand the natural world, physics gives us the ability to alter our environments. This raises the issue of the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. By studying physics students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterizes the subject. Teachers provide students with opportunities to develop manipulative skills, design investigations, collect data, analyze results and evaluate and communicate their findings.  The core components of the course are as follows:  1) Measurements and uncertainties, 2) Mechanics, 3) Thermal physics, 4) Waves, 5) Electricity and magnetism, 6) Circular motion and gravitation, 7) Atomic, nuclear and particle physics, 8) Energy production, 9) Wave phenomena, 10) Fields, 11) Electromagnetic induction, and 12) Quantum and nuclear physics.  Student will also choose one of these four topics: A. Relativity, B. Engineering physics, C. Imaging, or  D. Astrophysics. 


SCI 515-516HL 40.08602 Pre-requisite:  SCI 513-514 Credit:  1

IB Physics, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Core/Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It continues the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics

 

SOC 505-506SL 45.08701 IB History of the Americas, Year 1, SL     American (U.S.) History (45.08100)

SOC 505-506HL 45.08702 IB History of the Americas, Year 1, HL     American (U.S.) History (45.08100)

Pre-requisite:  Credit:  1

Teacher Recommendation Status:  Elective

Grade Level:  11-12

The DP history course is a world history course based on a comparative and multi-perspective approach to history. It involves the study of a variety of types of history, including political, economic, social and cultural, and provides a balance of structure and flexibility. The course emphasizes the importance of encouraging students to think historically and to develop historical skills as well as gaining factual knowledge. It puts a premium on developing the skills of critical thinking, and on developing an understanding of multiple interpretations of history. In this way, the course involves a challenging and demanding critical exploration of the past. Teachers explicitly teach thinking and research skills such as comprehension, text analysis, transfer, and use of primary sources. One of the following, using two case studies, each taken from a different region of the world: 1. Military leaders 2. Conquest and its impact 3. The move to global war 4. Rights and protest 5. Conflict and intervention.  World history topics Two of the following, using topic examples from more than one region of the world: 1. Society and economy (750–1400) 2. Causes and effects of medieval wars (750– 1500) 3. Dynasties and rulers (750–1500) 4. Societies in transition (1400–1700) 5. Early Modern states (1450–1789) 6. Causes and effects of Early Modern wars (1500–1750) 7. Origins, development and impact of industrialization (1750–2005) 8. Independence movements (1800–2000) 9. Evolution and development of democratic states (1848–2000) 10. Authoritarian states (20th century) 11. Causes and effects of 20th-century wars 12. The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century).  HL options: Depth studies One of the following: 1. History of Africa and the Middle East 2. History of the Americas 3. History of Asia and Oceania 4. History of Europe.


SOC 507-508HL 45.08930 Pre-requisite:  SOC 505-506 Credit:  1

IB History of the Americas, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It extends the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics.

 


SOC 509-510SL 45.01701 IB Psychology, Year 1, SL Pre-requisite:  Credit:  1

SOC 509-510HL 45.01702 IB Psychology, Year 1, HL Teacher Recommendation Status:  Elective

Grade Level 11-12

The IB Diploma Programme standard level psychology course aims to develop an awareness of how research findings can be applied to better understand human behavior and how ethical practices are upheld in psychological inquiry. Students learn to understand the biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior and explore alternative explanations of behavior. They also understand and use diverse methods of psychological inquiry.  Core 90 hours of standard level instruction on 3 topics • The biological level of analysis • The cognitive level of analysis • The sociocultural level of analysis.  30 hours of instruction on one additional topic • Abnormal psychology • Developmental psychology • Health psychology • Psychology of human relationships • Sport psychology. 


SOC 511-512HL 45.01712 Pre-requisite:  SOC 509-510  Credit:  1

IB Psychology, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It continues the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level related topics such as qualitative and quantitative research in psychology.

                                                                                                                                      

MLA 501-502SL 60.07131 Pre-requisite:  MLA 343-344 Credit:  1

IB Spanish, Year 1, SL (Level III Spanish) Grade Level:  11-12 Status: Core/Elective


The IB DP Language B is a language acquisition course designed for students with some previous experience of the target language. In the language B course, students further develop their ability to communicate in the target language through the study of language, themes and texts. In doing so, they also develop conceptual understandings of how language works, as appropriate to the level of the course. This course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken. This process allows the learner to go beyond the confines of the classroom, expanding their awareness of the world and fostering respect for cultural diversity: Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabus of language B; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest. The five prescribed themes are: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organization and sharing the planet. High performing standard level students should be able to follow university courses in other disciplines in the language  B that is studied. 

 


MLA 503-504SL 60.07162 Pre-requisite:  MLA 501-502 Credit:  1

IB Spanish, Year 2, SL (Level IV Spanish) Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Core/Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It extends the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics.


FAS 501-502SL 52.07301 IB Film, Year 1, SL Pre-requisite:  Credit:  1

FAS 501-502HL 52.07302 IB Film, Year 1, HL Teacher Recommendation Status:  Elective

Grade Level 11-12

The IB Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, the course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures. Components of the course include the following: Part 1: Textual analysis • Construction according to narrative or other formal organizing principles • Representation of characters and issues • Camera angles, shots and movement • Editing and sequencing • Lighting, shade and color • Sound • Location and set design • Features determining genre • Target audience • Historical, economic, sociocultural and institutional factors.  Part 2: Film theory and history Aspects of film theory and history can be introduced to students by asking such questions as: • Who made this? • Why? • What can we tell about the film-maker(s)? • For whom was it made? How does it address its audience? What is the nature of our engagement with film? • What outside influences can we perceive in terms of finance, ownership, institution and sociocultural context? • What tradition is it in (for example, American gangster film, Bollywood musical)? • To what other works might it be connected? Part 3: Creative process—techniques and organization of production Initial planning • Finding the idea • Research • Treatment and script development Pitch and approval • Developing the proposal • Negotiating the proposal with the teacher • Receiving approval to proceed Technical planning • Conceptualization • Visualization • Production scheduling • Editing and sound strategies Physical production • Pre-production • Production • Post-production Production journal Retention of materials.


FAS 503-504HL 52.07402 Pre-requisite:  FAS 501-502 Credit:  1

IB Film, Year 2, HL Grade Level:  11-12 Status:  Elective

This is the second year of a two-year program.  It extends the topics addressed in year one and adds higher level topics.



MLA 331-332 60.01100 Pre-requisite: None Credit: 1

French I Grade Level: 9-12 Status: Core/Elective

Students will be introduced to the French language and to the francophone people by means of textbooks, films, and extra- curricular activities.  Proficiency in the integrated skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be emphasized. Students will learn questions and expressions necessary to function in a French-speaking environment.


MLA 333-334 60.01200 Pre-requisite: MLA 332 Credit: 1

French II Grade Level: 10-12 Status: Core/Elective

Continued mastery of grammatical structures in both the spoken and written work is emphasized in French II. Increased vocabulary skills, translation skills and continued study of French civilization will be stressed. Students will be exposed to a variety of native French speakers by the use of tapes. The students will feel increasingly comfortable in using the spoken language. They will develop vocabulary skills by the use of related word studies.


MLA 335-336 60.01300 Pre-requisite: MLA 334 Credit: 1

French III Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Core/Elective

The learners will become increasingly adept at both speaking and understanding French. More advanced grammatical structures will be mastered. Compositions will be used to increase written skills. Translations of major French authors will be undertaken and both speaking and reading vocabularies will be increased.


MLA 337-338 60.01400 Pre-requisite: MLA 336 Credit: 1

French IV Grade Level: 11-12 Status: Core/Elective

Students will continue to build skills to an advanced level of oral and written comprehension. There will be increased interpretation of literature and extensive use of more complex grammatical concepts. (Textbooks:  D’accord, Level 3 © 2015; Publisher: Vista Higher Learning; ISBN: 978-1-62680-293-3; Thèmes © 2015; Publisher: Vista Higher Learning; ISBN: 978-1-68004-035-7)


MLA 437-438 60.01700 Pre-requisite: MLA 336